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Don't be late for class.

Don't be late to class.

Hi,

Are there subtle nuances between the above? Thanks.
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Late for is correct.

CB
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Hi, all

Yeah, I heard both versions too (late for work/class and late to work/class), but I haven't been able to completely wrap my head around the difference.

I once asked the same question and here is an explanation I got from a native British speaker:


I prefer 'late for work' in the sense that it's often with reference to one occasion as in: I must go now or I shall be late for work.

'Late to work' is slightly more remote and suggests to me an expression used by another person about you - the boss for example as in: I have looked at your record recently and I see you've frequently been late to work this month.

Maybe, some natives can weigh in on the discussion and offer their explanations

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Comments  
Thanks, Cool Breeze.

But some one said that "late to class" is also correct if the person who is concerned is already in school. That is, he is already in school, but late to class.
AngliholicBut some one said that "late to class" is also correct if the person who is concerned is already in school.
I see. I have never heard that. We'll have to wait for other opinions. Someone is one word, though.

CB
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 MrPernickety's reply was promoted to an answer.
"Late for class" is correct.

"Late to class" refers to "Late to classroom" in some countries. Though is not an accepted way of saying.

/Sam