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My classmate and I got into an argument over which language influenced English more as it's evolved. My classmate said German on a basis, of well, English is categorized as a Germanic Language. However, I told him that Latin has had a huge influence on the English language; in fact, 40% of the language comes from French alone. But he refused to agree with me. So, my question is: Which language has influenced English more? Latin (and languages influenced by Latin) or German (and languages influenced by German)?

~Much thanks.~
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I'm a little late, I think, but never mind.Emotion: smile
GuestMy classmate and I got into an argument over which language influenced English more as it's evolved.
German has influenced English very little after the three tribes Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded Britain in the 5th century AD. English resembles German, Dutch and Danish because the Saxons came from what is Hamburg today, the Angles came from what is Holland today and the Jutes came from Denmark.

However, afterthe 5th century only some German words have made their way into the English vocabulary whereas hundreds of thousands of Latin words have been adopted either directly or through French, which is just Latin gone bad.Emotion: smile There were about 5,000 words in Old English. English grammar resembles that of the other Germanic languages not because of German influence after the 5th century but simply because the grammar was imported from Germany, Holland and Denmark in the 5th century. The invaders brought the grammar with them, with the language or languages that they spoke. After those days, German influence doesn't really deserve a mention.

CB
I'm of the opinion that Dutch and German have more similarities than either has with English.
(I hope I'm not mistaken: In the past they considered themselves to be German
Dutch for German: duits
German for German: deutsch It's spelled somewhat different, however, pronunced similarly)

You can see from which word "Dutch" was taken.

Here is my German translation of the sentence above:

Quote: "Ik ben drie jaar oud en ik eet een koekje."
German: Ich bin drei Jahre alt und ich esse einen Keks.

If you sum all the German dialects and know the rules of pronounciation in the Dutch language you
can understand most texts in Dutch. You can even understand very much if you know things about German dialects that most people know although they've never spoken the dialect.

You can also see how many latin or greek words you can find in Dutch and these bring the most similarities between English and Dutch.

Heros, Animaal, FACIE - and if you search for a Germanic word for this:
Dutch:facie=Gezicht German:Gesicht

The dutch pronunciation could be a the pronunciation of a German dialect.
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Latin has deeply influenced English more. Though it is true that the Anglo-Saxon languge was a mix of German, French and Spanish turning into English, Latin roots and root-words are what make up the English languge.
Anonymous Though it is true that the Anglo-Saxon languge was a mix of German, French and Spanish turning into English,
Where on earth did you get that strange idea?