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I was wondering something similar in connection with one of the Guantanamo Bay detainees. David Hicks, an Australian, is about to come to trial, and one of the charges against him is "Aiding the enemy". Now, I have as yet no opinion on whether Hicks is a Good Guy or a Bad Guy, but the phrasing of that charge has me bamboozled.

Whose enemy? Hicks is not a US citizen. (Nor are most of the other detainees, who presumably will face similar charges some time in the future.) He was not on US soil at the time he was captured. It is not yet clear whether he was a combatant, but if so he certainly wasn't signed up with the US military. Yet now he's being charged with something akin to treason.
If a significant number of prisoners of war are charge with such a crime, it's going to send a clear message to other countries: if it's an American you capture, the Geneva Convention does not apply.

Someone is seriously playing with fire here. When you're setting legal precedents, the wording matters.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
time and book space could be allotted to what the ... Christians, the poor, the diseased, the imprisoned, and dozens of

Well put! In 1943, my great-grandparents-in-law were reduced to eating paper and cardboard to survive because there was no food, ... - which annoys the f*&k out of me. Would it be better if we were Jews? Of course it would!

Then I'm confused; I thought you said you are Jewish.
But on the other hand, it can be argued that lots of Americans, Canadians etc have received some form of ... right side of WW2 even though they personally had nothing to do with it. So it's not really Laura's fault.

The overall phenomenon I attempted to describe is, of course, not hers or any individual's doing. On the other hand, I have known many Jews who didn't consider their background an issue, much like how many people are uncomfortable, even, pledging allegiance to their flag, asserting their nationality, proclaiming the superiority of their country, differentiating their 'race' from that of others, and so on.

Charles Riggs
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They're unrelated to full moons, thank goodness: twelve a year would be a bit much.

Last night was the second full moon in July. According to some, that made it a "blue moon". The relationship of the color blue to two full moons in a calendar month escapes me.

I knew, fleetingly, the reason why we call them blue moons. I didn't find it interesting. The reason for it is described somewhere: that's enough for me. Others may Google on it, who knows?

Charles Riggs
So? Tough luck? We won the war. I don't see ... implying that Jews WEREN'T on the winning side of WW2...

That's an interesting concept to think about: were the Jews on any side in WW2?

Since it isn't a concept, it can't be interesting or, for that matter, uninteresting. Nor can it be thought about, as you suggest, since you can't think about nothing.
Many Jewish people joined the Resistance, naturally enough. I don't know of any who signed up for the Nazi Party.

Charles Riggs
That's an interesting concept to think about: were the Jews on any side in WW2?

Since it isn't a concept, it can't be interesting or, for that matter, uninteresting. Nor can it be thought about, as you suggest, since you can't think about nothing.

That, too, is an interesting concept. Why can't "Jews were on the winning side" (the obverse of his statement) be a concept? (concept = a thought or a notion; something conceived in the mind)

Why is it "nothing"?
Many Jewish people joined the Resistance, naturally enough. I don't know of any who signed up for the Nazi Party.

You think? Whoo! Another interesting concept. How could a Jew join the Resistance in Germany? Wasn't being a member of the Resistance supposed to be a secret from the government? It wasn't easy for a Jew to be secretly a Jew in Nazi Germany. It would seem that non-Jewish Resistance members would not welcome a Jew. It would kind of tip-off the government that the people involved were up to no good.
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I was wondering something similar in connection with one of the Guantanamo Bay detainees. David Hicks, an Australian, is about ... so he certainly wasn't signed up with the US military. Yet now he's being charged with something akin to treason.

Interesting point.
Incidentally, it brings to mind a remotely related occurrence, someone's calling Desmond Tutu an
African-American.
Last night was the second full moon in July. According ... to two full moons in a calendar month escapes me.

The AHD (at http://www.bartleby.com/61/70/B0347000.html ) says the following about 'blue moon': NOUN: 1a. The second of two full moons occurring in ... rare occurrence whereby the moon appears blue from high amounts of dust in the atmosphere, as from a volcanic eruption.

Sense 1a. has been traced to a mistake on page 17 of the July 1943 edition of Sky & Telescope by Laurence J. Lafleur (1907-66) of Antioch College, Ohio. Sense 1b. is correct, despite not having an ancient trradition.
Matti
2. (Informal) A relatively long period of time: "I haven't seen you in a blue moon."

Don't think I've ever heard anyone say that. Well maybe once in a blue moon.
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Don't think I've ever heard anyone say that. Well maybe once in a blue moon.

I've never heard anyone say that either, Dylan, I must admit, but who am I to argue with the American Heritage Dictionary?! :-)

Christopher ('CJ')
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