1 « 7 8  10 11 » 27
Areff wrote on 04 Aug 2004:
I'm really trying very hard to think of good things ... the 1960s. What else is there? The Interstate Highway system?

The Interstate Highway system is a mixed blessing. Sure, it speeds you on your way, so that, for example, I ... Real America from you, for the most part, the America of the Highways that Mr. Valentine is always talking from.

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance . But there is no such thing as Real America. On Interstate 80 up in Nebraska or Wyoming, however, there is Little America.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Was Benedict Arnold a citizen?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I believe you do.

Taking as given that a country actually has an offence named "treason", I don't see how. (Collins dictionary and COD9 ... US citizenship, and it didn't work. (No, this is probably a bad example, even if I knew about it properly.)

Like the other leaders of the Rebellion, he was charged with offences under the Defence of the Realm Act. I don't think he tried a defence based on American citizenship (which he didn't have) but it was a consideration for the Government when they were pondering his execution. By the time they were sure they could execute him, the outcry at the executions that already been carried out was such that they thought it prudent to reprieve him.
William Joyce (Lord Haw Haw) on the other hand was unquestionably an American citizen. On the technicality that he travelled to Germany on a British passport the court deemed it permissible to proceed with a charge of treason.

John Dean
Oxford
What if CJ joins the US Army? Even as a non-citizen he can. As a member of the US Army, he could certainly commit treason.

The issue is whether he has sworn allegiance to the US. All enlistees in the US Armed Forces take an oath,
, and, yes, the oath does include a profession of allegiance to the US well, literally to the Constitution. That's probably sufficient to permit a prosecution for treason, but there are enough other ways of prosecuting anything that would qualify as treason that it's hardly necessary.

Bob Lieblich
Who recalls taking an oath when he joined the Navy but isn't sure it was the same one
On 4 Aug 2004 00:01:22 GMT, CyberCypher
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance . But there is no such thing as Real America. On Interstate 80 up in Nebraska or Wyoming, however, there is Little America.

When I was a boy I used to see the roadside billboards for Little America somewhere in Wyoming. Sometime in the past year or three I chanced to be in a group who were discussing "Little America" as a great place to see and stay; to my surprise it turned out they were talking about one in Flagstaff, Arizona.
( http://www.littleamerica.com/flagstaff / .)
By the way, note the importance of accurate use of quotation marks in the difference between
... billboards for Little America somewhere in
Wyoming
and
... billboards for "Little American somewhere in
Wyoming"
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
CyberCypher daybed:
Richard Bollard wrote on 03 Aug 2004:

The US is not always on the right side.

Ach! You're talking nonsense here. The US is always on the right side because the US is always the side of right. And, by the way, Australia is almost always on the US side. Are you guys holier than we are or what?[/nq]It's a bit more complicated than that. In the two big wars Australia joined the US side two years before the US did, which I supppose has to count as holier than thou. In the case of Vietnam an Australian leader did in fact say "All the way with LBJ", but that led to so much domestic conflict that eventually an Australian government fell and the troops came home. (Admittedly, not all that long before the USA also decided to cut its losses.) Meanwhile, Australia was totally opposed to liberating all those Latin American countries, and even continued to trade with Cuba.

In the most recent fray, the war that finished a bit over a year ago, our Prime Minister supports the Bush position and therefore the nation officially supports it, but (as in Britain) there is a rather large rift between the Prime Minister's opinion and the people's opinion.
Actually, it's a lot more complicated than that. This week Australians on the side of left are busily sticking pins into effigies of Mark Latham, the opposition leader. We thought he would oppose the US-Australia free trade agreement - thereby killing it off - but he's just come out in favour of it. We still can't understand why he's now tongue-kissing the Prime Minister, given that he knows where that tongue has been.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Mike Lyle daybed:
I'm quite sure some of the cells were totally independent. ... secret to become widely known? Answer: tell it to someone.

The French, we are credibly informed, have a word for it. The adjective résistant , and very helpful it is in these cases.

Speaking of which: try not to miss the TV series "La bicyclette bleue". It's reasonably faithful to the book, and a gut-wrenching portrayal of the stresses between collaborators and resisters in Vichy France.
(Resisters? Resistors? The latter sounds more current.)

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Resistants?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I'm not sure, but I believe treason in the army is ruled by higher standards. Even a foreign mercenary may be charged with high treason by a court marshal.
Show more