Tonight I saw Larry King's interview with Lauren Bacall. She sounded like an English woman who had moved the US as an adult. Apart from her being non-rhotic and consistently so, it seemed to me , her vowels are more short than long (American vowels, in my judgment, are very long more often than not). I've just found out that she was born in New York, and apparently has always lived there. How come?
Bye, FB

Una volta ho comprato un salmone all'Ikea.
Sono arrivato a casa.
Era da montare.
(citato da Alessandro "Il Patriarca" Valli su
it.cultura.linguistica.italiano)
1 2 3 4 5
Tonight I saw Larry King's interview with Lauren Bacall. She sounded like an English woman who had moved the US ... not). I've just found out that she was born in New York, and apparently has always lived there. How come?

The US professional stage in the 1930s (when
Lauren Bacall's career began) valued a neo-English stage voice as (a) equally understandable by all
American audiences (e.g. in Texas, California,
the Midwest, New England, (b) invoking the skill
and ability admired in the English theatre (and
transmitted by some famous stars, e.g. Laurence
Olivier and Vivien Leigh, Cary Grant etc.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Tonight I saw Larry King's interview with Lauren Bacall. She sounded like an English woman who had moved the US ... ho comprato un salmone all'Ikea. Sono arrivato a casa. Era da montare. (citato da Alessandro "Il Patriarca" Valli su it.cultura.linguistica.italiano)

Because she is an actress and she is affecting the accent she likes.She sounds much earthier in old movies when she was younger.
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Tonight I saw Larry King's interview with Lauren Bacall. She ... New York, and apparently has always lived there. How come?

The US professional stage in the 1930s (when Lauren Bacall's career began) valued a neo-English stage voice as (a) equally ... admired in the English theatre (and transmitted by some famous stars, e.g. Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, Cary Grant etc.)

Right. That was then..
Tonight I saw Larry King's interview with Lauren Bacall. She sounded like an English woman who had moved the US ... just found out that she was born in New York, and apparently has always lived there. How come? Bye, FB

Bogart-Bacall syndrome
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list uids=3362010&dopt=Abstract
"Vocal fatigue and dysphonia in the professional voice user: Bogart-Bacall syndrome.
Koufman JA, Blalock PD.
Department of Surgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC 27103.

Over the past 5 years, the authors have treated 67 adult professional voice users with a musculoskeletal tension disorder involving the larynx and supporting structures and leading to vocal dysfunction. Common clinical features in both sexes were muscle tension in the neck, poor control of the breath stream, and an abnormally low-pitched speaking voice. Most of the men sounded like Humphrey Bogart and the women like Lauren Bacall. These cases represent a discrete clinical vocal fatigue syndrome, the treatment of which is patient education and voice therapy."

John Dean
Oxford
Tonight I saw Larry King's interview with Lauren Bacall. She ... New York, and apparently has always lived there. How come?

Bogart-Bacall syndrome and an abnormally low-pitched speaking voice. Most of the men sounded like Humphrey Bogart and the women like Lauren Bacall. These cases represent a discrete clinical vocal fatigue syndrome, the treatment of which is patient education and voice therapy."

At least he'll always have Paris.

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and an abnormally low-pitched speaking Most of the men sounded ... the treatment of which is patient education and voice therapy."

At least he'll always have Paris.

All Americans have Paris now. Here's the kindest thing I've seen anyone say about her yet:
(last paragraph of the review).

Liebs
Tonight I saw Larry King's interview with Lauren Bacall. She sounded like an English woman who had moved the US ... not). I've just found out that she was born in New York, and apparently has always lived there. How come?

Some other responses say she's faking it. I don't know that. She was born before WWII and there were accents in the Northeast (as you say, nonrhotic and certain vowels) that do resemble British accents especially to the Brits, who don't see the usual distinguishing markers that say "American" to them. Or they wouldn't be sure if the speaker was American or Irish. Probably any American could listen for a little while and decide the person was American, not British, but not on the basis of a single sentence.
You're Italian? You probably have several markers that tell you an accent is British (non-rhotic, those vowels) and several that tell you it is American, and that set of markers just isn't quite complete enough to include accents like hers.
None of us hear these old Northeast accents much, these days.

Any chance you can point us to a sound file of her speaking (not as a character)? Does CNN post bits of interviews?

Best Donna Richoux
You're Italian? You probably have several markers that tell you an accent is British (non-rhotic, those vowels) and several that tell you it is American, and that set of markers just isn't quite complete enough to include accents like hers.

I supposed she was English and had moved to the US, because of her changing too many t's to flaps, and some (A.) to (aEmotion: smile, for instance. And still, the background had to be British. I was wrong...
Angela Lansbury, say, sounds more American than Lauren Bacall; in the only episode of "Murder she wrote" I've watched, at least.
None of us hear these old Northeast accents much, these days. Any chance you can point us to a sound file of her speaking (not as a character)? Does CNN post bits of interviews?

http://snipurl.com/eq6o
She's not consistently non-rhotic here, and still it's very recent. Maybe yesterday night she wanted to speak another way, or I was very tired. Although even here she says (bA.diEmotion: smile ("body"), (stA.p) ("stop"), "that" with a short sound getting to (a). I, too, thought that she might be from New England, but she isn't.
Bye, FB

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