I just read an article about a man in Canada who chased his hat underneath a slow-moving semi (Do you English use that term? It's a big lorry) and was crushed. With regard to the driver of the truck, the article said, "no charges will be laid."
Is that the usual expression in Canada? In the US, we would say no charges will be filed. What about you people across the water?

Here's the article if anyone's interested:
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1120death-hat20-ON.html

Opus the Penguin (that's my real email addy)
"To the pure of heart, all proctology accidents are bizarre." - Rich Clancey
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I just read an article about a man in Canada who chased his hat underneath a slow-moving semi (Do you ... in Canada? In the US, we would say no charges will be filed. What about you people across the water?

"Laying charges" sounds normal to me; "filing charges" sounds strongly American.
On related terminology, am I correct in thinking that the term "indict" is in fairly common use in the US? (Whilst the action and word exists here, I don't think the term is in common circulation.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
I just read an article about a man in Canada who chased his hat underneath a slow-moving semi (Do you ... in Canada? In the US, we would say no charges will be filed. What about you people across the water?

"No charges will be pressed", probably. We do file petitions, though. And as for complaints, we lodge them.
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I just read an article about a man in Canada who chased his hat underneath a slow-moving semi (Do you English use that term?

No. We've discussed this before - we'd call it an articulated lorry.

David
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I just read an article about a man in Canada who chased his hat underneath a slow-moving semi (Do you ... in Canada? In the US, we would say no charges will be filed. What about you people across the water?

We prefer charges.
Matti
I just read an article about a man in Canada who chased his hat underneath a slow-moving semi (Do you English use that term?

No. We've discussed this before - we'd call it an articulated lorry.

That's a talking parrot, right?
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On 21 Nov 2003, Opus the Penguin wrote

I just read an article about a man in Canada ... will be filed. What about you people across the water?

"Laying charges" sounds normal to me; "filing charges" sounds strongly American. On related terminology, am I correct in thinking that ... use in the US? (Whilst the action and word exists here, I don't think the term is in common circulation.)

"Indite" is used but it's not all that common. It comes up more with politicians and celebrities accused of wrongdoing than with your average Joe Criminal. It was only a few years ago that I realized that the "indite" that I heard and the "indict" that I read were the same word that's how common it isn't.

Best Donna Richoux
I just read an article about a man in Canada ... will be filed. What about you people across the water?

We prefer charges.

You may prefer prefer, but I'm pressing for press.
"Indite" is used but it's not all that common. It comes up more with politicians and celebrities accused of wrongdoing ... "indite" that I heard and the "indict" that I read were the same word that's how common it isn't.

Commoner than "indite", though, I think.
David
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