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Dears,

I always thought that one can say "to lean against a door" but not "to lean on a door".
Could you please explain me why in some places they write the phrase "Do not lean on door" instead of "Do not lean against door".
Which of those two variants is grammatically preferable?

And why there is no article before the word "door"?
TIA for your reply.
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Anonymousould you please explain to me why in some places they write the phrase "Do not lean on door"
Why? To fit the words on a small sign. On has 2 letters, against has 7.

Where space is limited, such as a headline, words are left out, or shorter words are substituted.
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Thank you for the explanation and for the correction Emotion: smile
So, the phrase "Do not lean against the door" is more preferable from the point of view of the English grammar, but one can write "Do not lean on door" instead just in order to make the phrase shorter?

Many thanks in advance.

Rubbish answer. They are grammar rules for this...please provide

You could even put a sign o the door saying 'Do not lean.Emotion: smile

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
anonymous

Rubbish answer. They are grammar rules for this...please provide

Good gracious, anonymous. You are grousing about a post that was written nine years ago and has very happily lain dormant and fallow all these years.

There are no special "grammar rules" for signage. The words must fit the space and communicate the meaning very clearly, that's all.

In this day and age, you probably wouldn't see any words at all, just this attached to the door.