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Hello,

I am new here.
I would like to know the difference between:

a) learn of (999,000 results in Google) (Is it right?)
b) learn from (5,610,000 results in Google)

Thanks in advance.
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Hi gmelean,

Welcome to English Forums.

This is what I got from googling:

Learn of - 950,000
Learn from - 5,200,000
learn through - 522,000
learn to - 6,700,000
learn at - 802,000
learn in - 2,500,000
learn about - 11,300,000

Moral: be sure you are clear about what you are looking for when you google. 'Learn' collocates with a number of prepositions, generating different meanings. 'Learn of' generally means 'become aware of the existence of'; 'learn from' generally means 'acquire knowledge as a result of'. Their meanings are not particularly closely related.

All we have statistical evidence of is the relative commonness of 'learn from' over 'learn of'. However, this may be in part because of the similarity in meaning and overlap in use of 'learn of' and 'learn about'.
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Hi,

Thanks a lot for your answer.

So, I could say (please, tell me whether I am right or not):

Example a): I thought people in Japan drove like in America, but I learnt of they drive on the left side like in Britain after my first day in Tokyo.

Example b): I learnt from watching my grandfather how to fish at a pond.

Example c): 1) I learnt from a French teacher called Pierre (He was my teacher).
2) I learnt about a French teacher called Pierre (I read a book on his life).

Thanks again.
Best wishes.
a) I thought people in Japan drove as they do in America, but after my first day in Tokyo, I learnt that they drive on the left side as in Britain .

b): I learnt from watching my grandfather how to fish in a pond.

c) 1) I learnt from a French teacher called Pierre (He was my teacher). OK

2) I learnt about a French teacher called Pierre (I read a book on his life). OK
Thanks a lot again.
Best wishes.
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