+0
Howdy,

One sentence, lots of questions. If you could have a look.

1. I have been learning English for many years now and I studied it at university.

This one implies that I'm still learning English but that the studies period is over, right?

2. I learnt English for many years and studied in at university.

This one is a bit tricky for me. I don't know if this means that "I used to learn English some time ago and I'm not learning now" or "I have learnt it and I know it 100% so I don't have to learn anymore"

3. I have learnt English for many years...

How is it different from I have been learning English...

Cheers
Comments  
First, 'learn' is the wrong word here: learning is the final result of studying.

1. I have been studying English for many years now, and I studied it at university.

This one implies that I'm still learning English but that the studies period is over, right?-- No, for the reason I gave above. You are still studying English, though you may have finished your formal studies.

2. I studied English for many years and studied it at university.

This one is a bit tricky for me. I don't know if this means that "I used to learn English some time ago and I'm not learning now" or "I have learnt it and I know it 100% so I don't have to learn anymore"-- No. See above. #2 means you are no longer studying it. You have learnt some English, or perhaps you have learnt it completely after that much study.

3. I have studied English for many years...How is it different from I have been studyingThe second makes it clear that you are still studying now.
English...--
I'm not sure if I get the idea... let's try to clarify some things first. Why can't I use learn instead of study ? I've always thought they were the same. Have a look:

1. I'm learning English / I'm studying English
2. I'm learning how to dance (here studying doesn't feel right)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I'm learning how to speak English.-- OK.

There is no question that in the language business and out of it, the terms learn and study are often used interchangeably, but learn is the successful but involuntary acquisition of a skill while study is the conscious effort made to learn it. While one perceptibly comes to the end of 'learning to dance', i.e., it is a reasonably finite process, and one can say then that one has learnt to dance at some point, the same cannot be so easily said of the lifelong occupation of acquiring a language, and there are only rare segments of it that one can say one has learnt at any point in the process, though one has studied it for years.
Thank you MM. That's a good explanation.

Well, would you be so kind and dissipate my doubts? What tense would you use to mark the completeness of a process of acquiring a skill? If I want to say that I know the vocabulary connected with tourism from one book, can I say:

1. I have learnt all the words that are in this book.
or
2. I learnt all the words that are in this book.

And an additional question about what I've put in bold. Should I use the present tense "are in the book" or the past form "were in the book" or maybe "have been in the book" ?
How about this sentence? Is it correct?

I studied English for many years and I learnt it

EDIT: I'm still not sure why we can't say: I'm learning English and why we can say I'm learning how to speak English
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
1. I have learnt all the words that are in this book.
2. I learnt all the words that are in this book.
The above two follow the usual guidelines re simple past vs present perfect.

And an additional question about what I've put in bold. Should I use the present tense "are in the book" or the past form "were in the book" or maybe "have been in the book" ?-- Simple present; the words remain in the book to this day. Or you may regress the verb to simple past with the simple past main verb. Present perfect is not acceptable.

I studied English for many years and I learnt it -- Yes, I like that.

EDIT: I'm still not sure why we can't say: I'm learning English and why we can say I'm learning how to speak English. -- You can. As I said, many people do.