re: Leave? page 2

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Hello
I'd like to ask about "leave" and "forget."
Would you take a look at the following sentence?

1) I left my bag in the bus.

Can I exchange "left" to "forgot" like sentence 2)?
2) I forgot my bag in the bus.

Thank you.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Davkett - I would probably also say "I left my bag on the bus." I agree that the "forgot" version is foggier, but I think it's fairly commonly used. I'm surprised that it doesn't seem to be used that way in Britain.
Hi,

Thanks for all these possible interpretations of "forgot" and "leave".

MrPedanticInteresting. I don't think "I forgot my bag on the bus" can = "I left my bag on the bus" in British English.
I can't compare the flavors of English currently spoken nowadays, but I agree with MrP, in the sense, why would someone use the verb "to forget", when he actually means "to leave"?. I think originaly "to forget" implies: mistaking, while "to leave" (according to our topic) has the meaning of having done something on purpose like leaving the bag.
So if I'm the boss and you utter the word "to leave" when you actually mean "to forget",...I let you guess what I'll doEmotion: wink
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To use a real life example from last week (just call me Ms Absent-minded)

I left my swimming costume at the swimming pool. - Stupid me, I left it in the changing room after my swim and now I've got to buy a new one and have you ever tried finding a swimming cossie in the shops in November?!!!

I forgot my swimming costume at the swimming pool. - I most certainly did not. I do not swim naked in public!
Nona, does it mean we can use "to leave" and "to forget" interchangeably? The examples make sense the way you put them, and hold also(I think) when I use "I forgot" in the the second paragraph, and "I left" in the last one
I don't think they are interchangeable. I can see that you could possibly use 'forget' for leave but it doesn't seem to be a native British useage anyway, doesn't have that immediate meaning for me.

and you can't use leave to mean forget in my second example exactly...you could say 'When I got the pool I discovered I had left my costume behind' - this would mean I had forgotton to bring it and left it at home. Hmmmm. So how does this example fit, possibly in British English the phrase 'to leave behind' can mean forget whereas just 'leave' doesn't?

Confusing [:^)]
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I think originaly "to forget" implies: mistaking, while "to leave" (according to our topic) has the meaning of having done something on purpose like leaving the bag.

Okay, I'm going to jump back into this for a minute. "I left my bag on the bus" can mean either on purpose or by mistake. "I forgot my bag on the bus," while it could have a variety of meanings as discussed above, would usually mean "I left my bag on the bus unintentionally." Structurally it's awkward and ambiguous; however, I think many people (in the U.S.) would use it in conversation to mean "When I got off the bus, I forgot about my bag and accidentally left it on the bus."

I'm getting off this bus now. I hope I haven't forgotten anything!

P.S. to Nona -
"Swimming cossie"?? Don't ever ask for one of those in the U.S. - no one would have any idea what you're talking about! (Here it's just a "swimsuit." "Swimming costume" suggests that you want to go swimming disguised as a mermaid or something. "Costume" here is what I think you guys call "fancy dress." It's amazing we can communicate with each other at all, isn't it?)
Yes costume has the fancy dress meaning here too.

I've no idea why we call swimsuits swimming costumes (or cossies for short if the context is clear, I wouldn't go into a shop and ask for a cossie, but I would tell a friend I left my cossie behind last time I went swimming). I suppose it is a bit odd.

Perhaps it comes from the days when women would only 'bathe' (as they used to call swimming) in a full-on bloomers, dress and bonnet affair....