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Regarding the following sentence:

All else being equal, people who wait less than they anticipated leave happier than those who wait longer than expected.

I thought that grammatically, the "happier" in this sentence should have been written as "more happily," but it seems that native speakers often use this expression, doesn't it? What is your take on it?
Comments  
seagullAll else being equal, people who wait less than they anticipated leave happier than those who wait longer than expected.
He left the restaurant happy and satisfied.
"Happy and satisfied" is a subject complement. It means that he was happy and satisfied when he left the restaurant.

If you expect to wait 30 minutes, and you only have to wait 15 minutes, then you leave happier than if you had waited 45 minutes.
It means that the shorter you wait, the happier you will be.
Thank you very much indeed, AlpheccaStars.
I think I get the picture of this problem, thanks to your wisdom.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
While we're on the subject, consider this sentence:

He happily left the restaurant.

What do you think this means?
Thank you for your inspiring question.

He did the act of "leaving the restaurant" in a cheerful manner, but the reason why he did so was unknown. Maybe, he was very happy because he was able to leave the awful restaurant. -- Is that it?
seagullbecause he was able to leave the awful restaurant. -- Is that it?
Right.
Or maybe he was kicked out, and happy to get out of the place.
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AlpheccaStars Right. Or maybe he was kicked out, and happy to get out of the place.
I'm very happy to hear that.
Thank you so much, AlpheccaStars.