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Don't eat up the cake; leave us with a few pieces.

... leave us a few pieces.

... leave a few pieces to us.

... leave a few pieces for us.

Which ones of all of the above sound sound right? Thanks.
Comments  
Don't eat up the whole cake;

leave us with a few pieces. (wrong)

... leave us a few pieces. (wrong)

... leave a few pieces to us. (wrong)

... leave a few pieces for us. (correct)
Don't eat up the whole cake;

leave us with a few pieces. (wrong)

... leave us a few pieces. (wrong)

... leave a few pieces to us. (wrong)

... leave a few pieces for us. (correct)
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Can the first pharase be written as 'don't eat the whole cake up' ?. Is 'eat up' a separable pharasal verb?
My take:

'don't eat the whole cake up' ...Wrong
AngliholicDon't eat (up) all of the cake; leave us with a few pieces. possibly

... leave us a few pieces. OK

... leave a few pieces to us. No

... leave a few pieces for us. OK

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Yankee
AngliholicDon't eat (up) all of the cake; leave us with a few pieces. possibly

... leave us a few pieces. OK

... leave a few pieces to us. No

... leave a few pieces for us. OK

Thanks, Amy.

For the sake of clarification, what are the marginal differences between the first and the second version?
NooriIs 'eat up' a separable pharasal verb?
Yes
Anonymous
Yankee
AngliholicDon't eat (up) all of the cake; leave us with a few pieces. possibly

... leave us a few pieces. OK

... leave a few pieces to us. No

... leave a few pieces for us. OK

Thanks, Amy.

For the sake of clarification, what are the marginal differences between the first and the second version?
Basically, I just don't think the word 'with' is necessary.
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