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Hi all!

I was wondering whether the preposition "from" could be used after "leave" in the following example:

- The plane leaves Gatwick airport at 5 pm.

Is it correct if I say "the plane leaves from Gatwick aiport at 5 pm"?

I find this construction a little tricky, for when I phrase it in a different way, it turns out that a preposition is needed, even though dictionaries don't list "from" as one of the possibilities which could follow "leave". Here's my rephrasing which, I think, needs a prepositon after "leave":

- "The plane leaves at 5 pm from Gatwick airport".

Is this possible or not? I find this quite confusing, though I know it's a simple structure, I don't know why. Any ideas?

Thanks!

Mara.
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Riglos"The plane leaves from Gatwick aiport at 5 pm".
"The plane leaves at 5 pm from Gatwick airport".
To me, both are fine.

paco
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Hi Paco and thanks for your quick reply!

Now, what about "the plane leaves Gatwick airport at 5 pm"?

The problem is that "from" isn't listed as one possible option after "leave" in the dictionaries. Could you think of any reason why this is so?

Thanks!

Mara.
Leave in the sense of "depart from" can be used as transitive and intransitive verbs. If it is used as intransitive, it is normally construed with "from (the starting place)" or with "for (the destination)".
(EX) The plane left from JFK Airport at 10:15 am.
(EX) The plane left for London at 10:15 am.
(EX) The plane left JFK Airport at 10:15 am.

paco