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Would you like to leave the door open?
Would you like to leave the door opened?

Hi,
I presume the second of the above two doesn't sound right, but I don't know why. Could you shed some light? Thanks.
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Hi,
Would you like to leave the door open?
Would you like to leave the door opened?

I presume the second of the above two doesn't sound right, True, although I wouldn't call it wrong.
but I don't know why. Could you shed some light? Thanks

open - The focus is on describing the door. Maybe it has been open ever since it was built. We don't know or care.

opened - The focus is on the action that has been performed on the door. Someone or something has closed it.

I hope that you are not now going to ask about 'closed'.
Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi,

I presume the second of the above two doesn't sound right, True, although I wouldn't call it wrong.

Thanks, Clive.

I'm shocked that you wouldn't call it wrong; here, in the exam, the second has always regarded as wrong all the time. Would you shed more light on why you wouldn't call it wrong?
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Hi,

I did begin by saying that it doesn't sound right.
I already gave my explanation. Let me add to it by saying that the sentence sounds a bit like something that would be said for emphasis and even in exasperation.

Listen, you idiot, I have opened the door 6 six times, and you keep closing it. Would you like to leave the goddamned door OPENED?

Best wishes, Clive
Roger!

Thanks, Clive.

And best regards,

A

P.S.
There is a "been" missing in my last post. It should be put after "has."
Clive,
You know I was having this debate some time ago with a few people here and that was exactly my comment. We can leave a door "opened" or someone found the door open/ opened. But opened was considered wrong. I am glad I am not the only one!
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Is this because one is adjective and the other one is adverb ?

Thanks,
Dan
Hi,
No. Neither is an adverb.

Clive
AnonymousIs this because one is adjective and the other one is adverb ?

Thanks,
Dan

No. Adjective and past participle.
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