+0
Is it possible to leave out some and any in these sentences?:

We had some problems with the car.
We had problems with the car.

Would you like some wine?
Would you like wine?

I haven't got any money.
I haven't got money.

Have you got any brothers and sisters?
Have you got brothers and sisters?

As I'm a native spanish speaker, I wonder if this is possible and when, what's the difference between them and is there any rule to leave out these words? for some in positive and interrogatives and for any in negatives and interrogatives sentences.
+0
Latin,

Here are my opinions. I look foward to what others have to say.

We had some problems with the car.
We had problems with the car.

Both are okay. I prefer the second because it is shorter.

Would you like some wine?
Would you like wine?

It would depend on whether the guest already had guest. If the guest already had wine, the first phrase would make sense. The guest already has wine, so the question becomes, does the guest want some more wine? The second sentence seems awkward to me in this instance.

If the guest had no wine, the second would be preferable. It is shorter.

Have you got any brothers and sisters?
Have you got brothers and sisters?

The latter is preferable because it is shorter.

Let's see what others have to say.

MountainHiker
+0
Latin,
I hope you don't mind my saying this, but the word is not "doubts"! Emotion: sad
If you are Hispanic, you are probably translating "dudas" as "doubts".
This is not correct.

"I hope I can post all my questions" is correct. Emotion: smile
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  
Hola Latin,

Welcome to English Forums. I hope you find answers to all your questions here.

All your sample sentences are correct, but the ones with 'some/any' are more colloquial, while the ones without sound rather formal. 'Some/any' are used to suggest indefiniteness, and the speaker's use of these words offers more latitude to the listener for his response or interpretation; hence, using 'some/any' has a 'friendlier' tone-- it is more 'communicatively generous'.
 MountainHiker's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks Mr Micawber and moutainhiker, the explanation is clear, I guess the attitude here is important. I was worried because english grammar books don't tell these things and I thought that I was committing a violation of some rule, cause I never see o hear ex like these: "I'm not goig to answer questions" it's always "I'm not going to answers ANY questions" or with the expressions with there + be: there wasn't (ANY) furniture in the room, etc.

Now what about singular nouns?
When I say: there wasn't a book on the table = there wasn't any book on the table ?

I hope I can post all my doubts, I have a lotEmotion: smile .By the way, thanks for this site also.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.