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I admire her. (SVO).

Her I admire. (OSV).

The left dislocation of the object is due to emphasis on it.

"I know when he will come."

Here, the object is "when he will come". Is 'left dislocation' possible here and can we say the following?

"When he will come I know."

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I know when he will come.

The underlined element is not object, but an interrogative clause (embedded question), where the meaning is:

"I know the answer to the question 'When will he come?'"

Incidentally, your suggestion "When he will come I know" is not one of dislocation, but of preposing the interrogative, and is so unnatural as to probably be ungrammatical.

And your example "Her I admire" is simply one of preposing the object of "admire", not dislocation.

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While it is true that novelists and poets occasionally make use of "left dislocation", as you call it, it is not something you will often read or hear in conversations or texts.

Generally speaking, it is almost never possible, but you may hear it in conversation when a single word direct object is fronted, thus:

— Do you know Marilyn and Fred?
— Marilyn I know, but I don't know Fred.

CJ

(x-posted)

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Comments  
BillJAnd your example "Her I admire" is simply one of preposing the object of "admire", not dislocation.
What is meant by "left dislocation"? How does it differ from pre-posing?
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Sandip Kumar
BillJAnd your example "Her I admire" is simply one of preposing the object of "admire", not dislocation.
What is meant by "left dislocation"? How does it differ from pre-posing?

Dislocation and preposing are distinct constructions.

Dislocation constructions have an extra noun phrase located to the left or right of the main part of the clause, which is used as antecedent for a personal pronoun in the main part of the clause.

An example of left dislocation would be

One of my cousins, she has triplets

where the underlined noun phrase is antecedent for the pronoun "she".

An example of right dislocation would be

He can be very judgemental, her father

where the underlined noun phrase is antecedent for "he".


Both kinds of dislocation are fairly common and characteristic of informal conversational style.


Preposing, by contrast, involves putting an element (adjunct or complement) before the subject of a clause when its basic position would be after the verb:

When I was at school I wasn't allowed to watch TV. [adjunct]

The others I said he could have. [complement of "have"]

Preposing of adjuncts occurs quite freely, but complements are more constrained. They serve as a link to the preceding discourse, and must be closely related to information previously introduced into the discourse. In the above example, "the others" refers to a subset of things already mentioned.

BillJI know when he will come.The underlined element is not object, but an interrogative clause (embedded question
Can't a noun clause be an object of the verb 'know'?
Sandip Kumar
BillJI know when he will come.The underlined element is not object, but an interrogative clause (embedded question
Can't a noun clause be an object of the verb 'know'?

No: objects are (almost) always noun phrases, not clauses.

I strongly advise you to avoid the term 'noun clause'; it's a misnomer. Noun is a word class (part of speech), whose members include such words as "house", "man", "idea" etc.

Clauses do not belong to a word class at all. Instead, they are classified by other criteria, e.g. main or subordinate, finite or non-finite, relative, comparative, content etc.

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, could you please suggest me a few good books on modern grammar?
Sandip Kumar , could you please suggest me a few good books on modern grammar?

I very rarely recommend textbooks.

If you are an English teacher (as your profile says), then I imagine that you must already have a good supply of modern grammar books to hand. I doubt if there's much wrong with them.