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"Andrea Yates, the Texas mother charged with the murder of her five children, has a documented history of postpartum depression and psychiatric hospitalization, yet the district attorney prosecuting her case recently offered to take a possible death penalty off the table if she would withdraw her insanity plea."

My interpretation:

Andrea Yates murdered all her 5 children. She has been suffering from mental disorder since she was born and , for this reason, has been in hospital many times.

The district attorney instituting the legal proceedings against her proposes that the consideration of her possible death penalty should be abandoned, provided she withdraw (subjunctive -- no 's' inflection in withdraw) the plea of insanity.

Is this not odd?

The text says the seriousness of the murder should be mitigated in case Jane Doe claims she is sane.

If she is sane, then she was fully aware of the seriousness of the crime she commited.

It is hardly any mitigating circuimstance.

What is you understanding of this?

Thanks

PS: Are there any grammatical mistakes in the blue part?
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She has been suffering from mental disorder since she was born. No. 'post-partum' means after the birth of her children, not her own birth. She has a history of post-natal depression. She has been hospitalised for this but it doesn't necessarily mean many times. She might have only been in hospital once (but I agree that it does imply more than once).

her proposes that the consideration of her possible death penalty should be abandoned, provided she withdraw (subjunctive -- no 's' inflection in withdraw) the plea of insanity.The text says the seriousness of the murder should be mitigated in case Jane Doe claims she is sane.

You've not quite followed their meaning.

One possible sentence for murder is the death penalty. There are other penalties.

She will be tried with murder whatever her plea. Everyone gets to plea guilty or not guilty, or they can plea guilty but not really responsible for their actions due to insanity. If she pleads guilty but insane, she probably wouldn't be sentenced to death. The attorney does not believe that she is insane, but just making that plea to avoid the death penalty. therefore, he is saying 'we'll make a deal. You save us all the time and trouble of a long and expensive court case trying to decide if you are insane or not. If you just admit you are sane and guilty, I'll agree that you still won't be sentenced to death, just imprisonment.'

hospitalization, yet the . This 'yet' shows that the writer finds this unreasonable as he/she believes that the woman has a history of mental illness so quite possibly did commit the murders while insane, and should therefore be able to plead guity but insane. (and get a lesser punishment).

The text says the seriousness of the murder should be mitigated in case Jane Doe claims she is sane. No this is not what it means. They are not mitigating the seriousness of the murder itself, but saying that she should not be held as responsible for it as a sane person would. They know that the case will be treated less severely if she is found insane. If she agrees to remove her defence of insanity she will be treated less severely than if she had not tried to claim insanity in the first place (to encourage her to drop this claim). But it will still be more severely than if she were to stick to her plea of insanity and be found insane.

not: the seriousness of the murder should be mitigated in case Jane Doe claims she is sane (the in case part here doesn't make sense by the way, but I know what you mean).

but rather: the seriousness of the punishment should be mitigated to make Jane Doe admit she is sane.
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It's not odd because the prosecution wants a conviction. If her insanity plea is accepted, then she'll 'get away with it' basically. So, the prosecution is basically saying that if her insanity plea is not accepted and she is found guilty then they'll push for the death penalty. But if she withdraws her insanity plea - thereby pretty much guaranteeing a conviction, they will not push for the death penalty.

I think that's what's happening anyway.
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Comments  
Hello Nona

yet the district attorney

Oh yes.

Some of the things you objected to I interpreted clearly, but expressed wrongly.

Thanks Tidus and Nona
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