OK, confused re the correct 'UK / English' spelling - is it lessons learned or lessons learnt - or does it not matter?

Thanks in advance for your help.
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AnonymousOK, confused re the correct 'UK / English' spelling - is it lessons learned or lessons learnt - or does it not matter?

Thanks in advance for your help.
I'm a Yank who uses "learned". As far as I know, our British cousins use "learnt" and pronounce it as it appears.
This should answer your question:

What is the difference between learned and learnt?
These are alternative forms of the past tense and past participle of the verb learn. Learnt is more common in British English, and learned in American English. There are a number of verbs of this type (burn, dream, kneel, lean, leap, spell, spill, spoil etc.). They are all irregular verbs, and this is a part of their irregularity

source: Ask Oxford.com (Oxford Dictionaries)

...I'll be using learnt from now on (The idea of writing spoilled or burned annoys me)
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AnonymousIn British English, both forms are correct.- This isn't true!!
As a ESOL teacher in Britain, I don't object to students using American spellings and grammar providing they are aware that they are using them and using them for everything. Learned is incorrect in BrE. (In fact the first time I saw it on this site, I contacted a Native American Speaker to check it was correct).

Philip is correct.
If I remember well what I learned at the highschool in latin (it was 45 year ago) terms gerundium and gerundivum were two different forms of a verb: learnt supposed to be used together with an auxiliere verb, while the other is an adjective/adverb from the verb learn. It replies on the question which lessons, what type of lessons? Just in the context of lessons learned is learned an adjective and should be learned.
I always considered it in terms of past perfect or past imperfect; that is to say the choice of phrase should be determined by whether you are referring to a discrete event (I learnt a valuable lesson that day) or an ongoing experience (we learned to respect each other's views).

So you might say "what have we learnt today?" or "as a child, I learned to play the flute"

just my opinion - I cannot back this up with any official view on the topic!

HTH
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In UK English, learned is an adjective and is pronounced as lurn-id. An example use:
These are learned professors (i.e. with much knowledge).
On the other hand, learnt (pronounced lurnt) is the past tense of learn.
Hence, the statement "lessons learnt" is about the lessons that were learnt from a particular experience.

Anonymous
In UK English, learned is an adjective and is pronounced as lurn-id. An example use:
These are learned professors (i.e. with much knowledge). On the other hand, learnt (pronounced lurnt) is the past tense of learn.Hence, the statement "lessons learnt" is about the lessons that were learnt from a particular experience.
In any English, either British or American, Australian, etc, within the statement "lessons learnt", the learnt part is grammatically a past participle, NOT a past simple. In any case, if you wish to consider Oxford Dictionaries as a reliable source for British English (I would), learned and learnt can be used each one as both past simple and past participle; though, the learnt form is more proper, being "to learn" an irregular verb. And yes, of course, learned is also an adjective.
Dave Phillips Learned is incorrect in BrE. (In fact the first time I saw it on this site, I contacted a Native American Speaker to check it was correct).
...This is complete nonsense. Both "learnt" and "learned" are absolutely standard British English (with "learned" listed first in Chambers 21st Century Dictionary).
In the fixed expression "lessons learned", "learned" is definitely the favoured form (nearly 25 million hits versus less than 3 million).
The whole struggle to maintain US/UK distinctions in English is in any case increasingly futile given internet globalisation, to say nothing of its pointlessness as a project.
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