A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English language coursebook which contained a section on the use of "lest". I opined that that such constructions were archaic, and had no place in such a work.
Of course, an English student may need to be familiar with the construction, in case he encounters it in reading, but I don't think anyone would use it today, even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line).
Comments?

Mark Barratt
Budapest
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A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English language coursebook which contained a section on the use of ... in reading, but I don't think anyone would use it today, even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line).

It's productive in Africa & America. What's happened to Europe?

"Lest we forget."
Of course, an English student may need to be familiar with the construction, in case he encounters it in reading, but I don't think anyone would use it today, even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line). Comments?

The students may one day encounter a memorial that reads "Lest we forget" and will ask themselves what the text means?

BTW: My two Webster's don't listen them as "archaic"?

BlueS, Carsten http://fallschirmspringen-in-gera.de
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A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English language coursebook which contained a section on the use of ... reading, but I don't think anyone would use it today, even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line). Comments?

OK. The subject line indicates that you're trying to disinterest us. That's interesting. I think they should keep that section. CDB
A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English language coursebook which contained a section on the use of ... reading, but I don't think anyone would use it today, even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line). Comments?

Still current, I think, in some set phrases. To tell the truth, I have been saving a comment on the confusion in pronunciation between "lest" and "least". Last week on a cooking show (Paula Dean, southern style cooking) used "least" instead of "lest". Sorry I can't recall the rest of the sentence. I wouldn't find it difficult to use "lest" if I were making a special point with special language, though I would normally say "unless".

Paula is a fair source of some regional usages (from Georgia), though some word choices are a bit exaggerated. Today she pronounced "spatula" as "spatchuler" probably pretty normal for her area.
Mark Barratt wrote on 16 Mar 2005:
A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English language coursebook which contained a section on the use of ... reading, but I don't think anyone would use it today, even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line). Comments?

Lest we forget, 'tis necessary to provide contemporary sources for us to remember how to use useful bits of language that there is no good reason to throw away.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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Pat Durkin wrote on 17 Mar 2005:
A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English ... even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line). Comments?

Still current, I think, in some set phrases. To tell the truth, I have been saving a comment on the ... on a cooking show (Paula Dean, southern style cooking) used "least" instead of "lest". Sorry I can't recall the rest

That'd be "reast", I do believe, y'all.
of the sentence. I wouldn't find it difficult to use "lest" if I were making a special point with special language, though I would normally say "unless".

Trouble is that it means "for fear that", nopt "unless".
Paula is a fair source of some regional usages (from Georgia), though some word choices are a bit exaggerated. Today she pronounced "spatula" as "spatchuler" probably pretty normal for her area.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
'Henry Kissinger once justified U.S. support for the Pinochet coup in Chile by saying "I don't see why we need to stand by and watch a country go communist due to the irresponsibility of its own people."' Time Magazine article
A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English language coursebook which contained a section on the use of ... reading, but I don't think anyone would use it today, even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line). Comments?

I might begin the second paragraph, "Of course an English student might need to be familiar with the constuction, lest he encounter it in reading..."

On second thought, I might say "lest they".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Steve Hayes wrote on 17 Mar 2005:
A student of mine showed me a recent (British-produced) English ... even without a subjunctive (as in the subject line). Comments?

I might begin the second paragraph, "Of course an English student might need to be familiar with the constuction, lest he encounter it in reading..." On second thought, I might say "lest they".

But it like don't mean that "in case"-type thang at all, Steve. It's bobvious that "lest" existeth not in South African English.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
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