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He let me go.

So I was let go
Or I was let to go.
which is grammatically right?
Thanks
Comments  
Hi,

I was taught not to use let in the passive, so I would write 'I was allowed to go.'

Wait for the natives. Emotion: wink
Hi,

'Let go' can be used with various meanings.

'Let me go' can be said if someone is physically holding you.

Thus, 'I was let go as soon as I complained', alhough this sounds a bit awkward.

'I was let go' is commonly said, particularly at this time of recession.

It's a nicer way of saying 'I was fired'.

No 'to'.

The phrase 'I'll have to let you go now' is also used commonly on the phone to tell someone that you want to terminate the conversation.

It makes it sound like the person who says it does not really want to end the conversation,but has some external necessity to.

eg I'll have to let you go now (because my house is on fire).

Clive
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Do you want the sentence to mean that you were permitted to go somewhere? If so, Tanit is correct.

Or do you mean the common US usage referring to being dismissed from employment? In which case it's "I was let go" (I think. But I'm not American Emotion: smile)
This is not a good example. I'll explain why later. In the meantime, let's take He let me drive the car.

There is really no good passive for these. I was let drive the car and I was let to drive the car are both unacceptable. Change let to allowed to.

He let me drive the car.
(He allowed me to drive the car.)

I was allowed to drive the car.
____________

The same principle applies when let go means allow to go.

He let me go.
(He allowed me to go.)

I was allowed to go.

____

But when let go is used with the idiomatic meaning "dismissed from one's job", you can say:

The boss let me go.
(The boss fired me.)

I was let go. (I was fired.)

CJ
Thank you all! I didn't know about "to be let go" meaning "to be fired".
That would be sort of an exception to the rule, right?

PS: Coloraday, I told you you'd better wait for the natives, didn't I? Emotion: smile
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I didn't mean to use it idiomatically .Noticing not being of any to in the first sentence,I just wanted to know if the sentence in the passive form has to or not.
Let ask it in another way.
He made me sell the shop.
I was made sell the shop.
I was made to sell the shop.
Here made doesn't mean prepared just passive form of the first sentence. 
Thanks
Hi,

Let ask it in another way.

He made me sell the shop.

I was made sell the shop. I wouldn't say this is wrong, but it sounds literary, almost archaic, and very unusual.

I was made to sell the shop. Ths is the normal modern form.

Clive
coloradayLet ask it in another way.
He made me sell the shop.
I was made sell the shop.
I was made to sell the shop.
Very interesting question. My "native-speaker instinct", it turns out, is different from Clive's.

I'd say that I was made sell the shop is just plain ungrammatical and that I was made to sell the shop sounds old-fashioned. On the other hand, I can't think what the modern English form would be if not the second one.

CJ
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