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Let or leave?

1 Let your phone charge./Leave your phone (to) charge.
2 I've been chasing after the money he owes me for months. (Is the word CHASE?)
3 He caught the ball from afar/very far.

Thank you
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1 Let your phone charge./Leave your phone (to) charge.-- Both in use.

2 I've been chasing after the money he owes me for months. (Is the word CHASE?-- Yes)
3 He caught the ball from afar/very far.-- Hard to do without very long arms. He caught the ball far away.
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alc241 Let your phone charge./Leave your phone (to) charge. "To" is not optional.

2 I've been chasing after the money he owes me for months. I've heard this. (Is the word CHASE?) I don't know what you mean.

3 He caught the ball from afar/very far. Not idiomatic. Implies he caught the ball remotely. "Leave him be" is an old usage, rather colloquial and lower register. "Leave your phone charge" would be an example of this usage.
Let it charge. Leave it to charge is fine.
Leave it to ferment is good. Let it ferment is good.
Leave it to be repaired is common.
Let go of my arm. good. Leave go of my arm. colloquial

Edit. Did you mean by "is the word CHASE," that "to chase the money" is preferable to "to chase after the money"?
My answer would be that both are used.

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Comments  
#2 sounded strange. He is the one who owed you the money which you loaned to him. So when times comes to repay and he failed to do so, it is only logical that you chased him for the money he owed you; not the money. Doesn't that make sense?
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Anonymous Doesn't that make sense?
Your version also seems possible, but sometimes unlikely expressions become idiomatic, as in "Follow the money."
To me, without such a history of usage, "chased him for the money" sounds like you're physically chasing him (eg., down the street!)