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1) I heard that 'let object p.p' is wrong. Explain the reason please.

ex) Don't let him be misunderstood. ----> right./ Don't let him understood. -----> wrong. Why?

2) I love her better than he. ---------> Is this right? I thought that it should be 'I love her more than he.' Do you use both?
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Hello,

Good morning! Here is my try:

1) I heard that 'let object p.p' is wrong. Explain the reason please.

ex) Don't let him be misunderstood. ----> right./ In this sentence you don't want people misunderstand him.This is wrong. Don't let him understood. However, in this sentence you don't want people even try to understand him. Sounds odd a bit. It would be better for you if you know the meaning of misunderstanding. Both of the sentenceses are wrong because don't forget this formula: let someone do something.

misunderstand: verb (used with object), -stood, -stand·ing.

1.to take (words, statements, etc.) in a wrong sense; understand wrongly.


2.to fail to understand or interpret rightly the words or behavior of.


www.dictionary.com

2) I love her better than he. ---------> Is this right? I thought that it should be 'I love her more than he.' Do you use both? Unfortunately, I use neither of them. I would write I love her more than him. If you want to compare your love, use "more" not "better." And don't forget to use the right pronoun, "him". We can't say he because he is not in the subject position here. You can get help from this site: http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/pronomen.htm

Jisu981) I heard that 'let object p.p' is wrong. Explain the reason please.

ex) Don't let him be misunderstood. ----> right./ Don't let him understood. -----> wrong. Why?

2) I love her better than he. ---------> Is this right? I thought that it should be 'I love her more than he.' Do you use both?

I love her more than he [loves her]. I love her more than him. ('More' is definitely better than 'better'.)

'Don't let him be misunderstood' is perfectly fine.
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Thank you for your answer.

What about 'Don't let him misunderstood'?

perfectly right, just can use. wrong. totally wrong?
Jisu981) I heard that 'let object p.p' is wrong. Explain the reason please.

ex) Don't let him be misunderstood. ----> right./ Don't let him understood. -----> wrong. Why?

Don't let him understood doesn't make sense at all.

understood is a particple here. Don't you use 'be verb' in front of passive particples?
1) I heard that 'let object p.p' is wrong. Explain the reason please.

ex) Don't let him be misunderstood. ----> right./ Don't let him understood. -----> wrong. Why?
_________

It's hard to see what kind of reason you would like as an explanation of why.
_________

You may as well present the following:

I heard that We doesn't is wrong. Explain the reason please.

Ex. We don't know the answer. ---> right / We doesn't know the answer. ---> wrong. Why?
_________

The answer is the same for both:
Because that's the way English works.

I don't think there is a more complicated answer than that.

CJ
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I learned that there are 5 types of word formaiong.

some verbs are followed by an object and a complement for the object: That is, S(usually noun) + V(verb)+ O(usually noun)+ O.C (usually noun or object)

let is of this kind. let + o+ o.c;

1) usually O.C should be a noun or an abject. But verb can be a complementary of some special verbs. for example, let, have, allow can take verbs (bare infinitive (in case of active) or past participle(passive) ) as their o.c.

Therefore, I can understand that "Don't let him be(bare infinitive) misunderstood." is a right sentence.

2) let + o+ o.c (noun, adjective) should be considered a right sentence.

Then, misunderstood ( past participle of a verb used as an adjective) can be considered as an adjective. right?

If 'misunderstood' can be considered as an adjective, "Don't let him misunderstood" seems to be alright. but it is not a correct sentence. I mean, gramartically, there seems no fault in the sentnece. But why not correct? in meaning?