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let something rip
(phrase of rip)


INFORMAL
allow something to happen forcefully or without interference


"once she started a tirade, it was best to let it rip"


(The Google Dictionary.)


Does "once she started a tirade, it was best to let it rip" mean that she was not stopped when launching into the tirade/she was allowed to finish her angry outburst without being interrupted?

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tkacka15she was allowed to finish her angry outburst without being interrupted

Yes.

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Thank you for the reply.

This phrase is typically used in a more lively, command-like fashion, for example:


"Is everything in place? Is everybody ready? Ok, let 'er ( = her) rip!"

What you should take away from this thread is that Google Dictionary is doing you more harm than good. Use a real dictionary like the ones at onelook.com. The sample sentence, "once she started a tirade, it was best to let it rip", is defective. You don't let it rip, she does. The writer confused the "let" of the set phrase "let it rip" (almost invariably "let 'er rip", by the way) with the different "let" in "let her finish her tirade" (what he meant).

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anonymousWhat you should take away from this thread is that Google Dictionary is doing you more harm than good. Use a real dictionary like the ones at onelook.com. The sample sentence, "once she started a tirade, it was best to let it rip", is defective. You don't let it rip, she does.

The example sentence is from https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/rip

GPYThe example sentence is from https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/rip

Thank you. I guess that means that British usage allows the construction I disparaged.

anonymousThank you. I guess that means that British usage allows the construction I disparaged.

I think it is very unlikely that there is any systematic difference between BrE and other forms of English in respect of this usage (and, in fact, the same example is also in the "US English" dictionary at the same site). I too think that it is more usual or more likely that "she" would let the tirade rip rather than "you", but I wouldn't say that the latter is actually wrong. This is most probably just a personal variation.

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