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Do I LET the car in the driveway or LEAVE the car in the driveway?
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You LEAVE the car in the driveway.Emotion: automobile
You let the car in the driveway means you are driving it, you leave the car in the driveway means you leave your car there because of some mechanical,... problems. Did I catch your point?
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Thanks for expanding on that, LL Emotion: smile
Hi LL, I got some doubts:

"You let the car in the driveway means you are driving it"
- I didn't get "let" with "driving it" very well, would you explain it again in other form? What is the connection between "let" and "driving it"? Btw, shouldn't it be "on the driveway" instead of "in the driveway" or can I use both?

About Let vs Leave:

In my point of view, "Let" has the meaning of "allow", "Permit" instead of "Leaving". Like in the phrases below:

• I did let my family know I'm going to get married.
• I did let him talk
• I did let her know
• Let me help you
• Let me introduce myself
• Let's check it out

And Leave:

• I did leave my family after I get married. We moved out to other country.
• I did leave him talking by himself
• I did leave her alone
• Leave me alone
• Leave your message

Cheers,
Lucato.
Dear Abbie, please come to my help while I'm trying to find similar examples of a different usage of "let", as in my response! I let my car into the driveway means that I entered the driveway. Correct me Abbie if I'm wrong.
And about the preposition Lucato, here is what I've found from the Cambridge Online Dictionary: I parked in the drive. ("drive" is the short form of "driveway".) So, it's correct to say "I left the car in the driveway".
Hope that it helps,
Cheers,
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Guest,
I've moved your post to "General English grammar questions"
You'll get more readings/answers here, I think.
Let = to allow or permit something.

"You let the car into the driveway"

So, in LL's example, someone is driving the car, and you allow it into the drive, perhaps by opening the gates, or saying that the person driving can leave it there.

I think you can use either 'on' or 'in' here.

The simple past of the verb 'let' is - 'let'
• I did let my family know I'm going to get married.
* I LET my family know I'm going to get married.

• I did let him talk
* I LET him talk

• I did let her know
*I LET her know
Emotion: smile

• Let me help you ?
• Let me introduce myself
• Let's check it out

These are correct

The past simple of the verb 'to leave' is LEFT

• I LEFT my family after I GOT married. We moved out to other country.
• I LEFT him talking by himself
• I LEFT her alone

The other two examples are correct.
@ LanguageLover
Thanks, I got it. It helped me.

@ abbie1948
Hi Abbie, thanks for your help too. Btw, English insn't my native Language, so I got a new doubtEmotion: smile

when I've said:
• I did let my family know I'm going to get married.
• I did let him talk
• I did let her know
• I did leave my family after I got married. We moved out to other country.
• I did leave him talking by himself
• I did leave her alone

I've use "did let" and "did leave" as emphasising the phrases. So, is it wrong to use "did" this way? I mean, let's suppose somebody had asked me:

Are you sure you did let her know?
Yes, I did let her know.

Thanks in advance.
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