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Hi teachers,
What's the neaning of 'let's get going' in the following conversation.

Two detectives are walking and talking.
Halls: A lot of us wonder why Scotland Yard is so interested in this fellow Coke.

Narrator: Baxter was already half-way to the car before he said anything.
Baxter: Coke isn't just an ordinary prisoner. He's ver special. Let's get going.

Thanks in advance
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thinking SpainNarrator. Baxter wasted very little time on social formalities.
Baxter: Coke escaped more than 24 hours ago. I want to catch him before another 24 hours are up.
In this example we have very little context. We don't know how the detectives are planning to capture Coke.
If they know where he is, and simply need to get there before he leaves, their job will be mostly physical.
If they need to do some investigative work to determine his whereabouts, some of that might be "mental."
If Baxter feels his partner is lazy and dragging his feet on the whole assignment, then yes, as you say, he's trying to change his partner's mental attitude, and get him to be more agressive.

Studying irregular verbs is a mental task. The decision to get moving on it is also mental.

If you're on a day hike and learn there's a storm coming up, you may decide to hurry home before the storm breaks. Rushing home is completely physical. The decision to apply yourself to the job of getting there in a hurry is mental.

"To get going" can refer to "running faster" (physical) or to "quit being so lazy," (mental) or to both.
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AvangiIf they need to do some investigative work to determine his whereabouts, some of that might be "mental."
I think this is the one because so far they have no idea about where Coke is according to the episode.
Thinking Spainthe expression has to do more with a mental state than with a physical state, doesn't it?
No. Let's get going is close to Let's start / Let's get started, so it depends what you are starting. You might be starting to move physically or you might be starting to think about something -- or both. The idea is that you're encouraging someone to "attack the problem" whether it's the "problem" of going to the store to buy groceries (Let's get going!) or the "problem" of preparing dinner (Let's get going!) or the "problem" of memorizing lines for a play (Let's get going!).

CJ
I think I see what you're driving at.
Thinking SpainNarrator. Baxter wasted very little time on social formalities.
Baxter: Coke escaped more than 24 hours ago. I want to catch him before another 24 hours are up.
Thinking SpainHalls: A lot of us wonder why Scotland Yard is so interested in this fellow Coke.
Narrator: Baxter was already half-way to the car before he said anything.
Baxter: Coke isn't just an ordinary prisoner. He's very special. Let's get going.
I'm reminded of when I was about four. My mother and I often walked two miles to the market.
I was even more obstreperous then than now, and was usually dragging my feet.
She'd say, "Come on, Mr. B, let's get a move on!"
She was actually out in front, so the imperative plural "Let us X" was directed only at me. She was trying to correct both my mental attitude and my physical action.
I think "Let's get going" is sometimes used to chide the reluctant partner.
The shorter form, "Let's go!", can have a critical, scolding impact, eg, when a teammate flubs the ball.

In the original scenario, Halls is portrayed as the reluctant foot-dragging partner. Baxter is portrayed as already on the move!
I take the "24 hours" line as directly critical of Hall's attitude. (The situation is already bad. Don't make it worse!)

The "Let's get started" interpretation seems more appropriate in cases where both partners are sitting around drinking beer, and are totally unenthusiastic about the prospect of "getting to work."

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Thank you to you both. Reading your commentaries and interpretations make me think a lot!!Emotion: nodding