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Please correct/verify if I am using this sentence grammatically wrong.

I wrote an email to all team members. The conclusion of the email ended with a command to tell everyone to win:

"Lets win all games this week."

Because there is a hidden subject "everyone", the sentence is correct:

"[Everyone] Lets win two games this week."

A good friend told me the sentence should be "Let's win all games this week." I understand her point let's is a contraction of let us. Thus, the sentence is "Let us win all games this week."

Here are my questions:

  1. Is there anything wrong with a sentence, "Lets win all games this week."?
    I found many criticisms using "lets" on the web.
  2. If question 1 is correct, which is more appropriated to use in the context above?

The way I understand these two sentences are different.

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Comments  (Page 4) 
A "let" is a serve in tennis which hits the net.

So, it certainly is possible that your opponents are going to be SO bad at serving that every single game this week will be won by their hitting the net on the serve.

But I wouldn't count on it.  I mean, ARE your opponents that bad at serves?

If you are trying to encourage  people to win all the games this week, it would be "Let's".  "Lets" are multiple serves that hit the net.  "Let's" is short for "let us."
Actually, lets is a word. For example, he lets us eat candy.
taiwandaveBecause "let" is a verb, it has no plural form. So there is no such word as "lets". It is always "let's", which you correctly noted is the contracted form of "let us".

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It should be Let's in the context you're talking about. Lets without the punctuation is for when you say something like, Mom lets me jump on the bed. Making the word let, plural.
Example:

He lets us use the bathroom often.

The word "lets' would appear to appropriate in this context.
not entirely correct... what about 'he lets go of the rope'?
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You are right that there is no plural form of the verb 'let.' But there is a word 'lets', as in, "He lets the cat out each morning."
Of course, there is such as word as "lets;" that is, not a plural form but the conjugation of the verb "to let" in certain cases with the you/he/she/it form. Take for example: "She lets her baby play with his toys far too much."
That's not true.

Let is a verb so in the third person it becomes "lets". I.e. He/she lets her friend complain to her all the time.
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Well gee, that lets me off the hook.
taiwandaveBecause "let" is a verb, it has no plural form. So there is no such word as "lets". It is always "let's", which you correctly noted is the contracted form of "let us".