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Hi, I was doing a search on common mistakes in English an I found this text:

“ Two very easily confused words. Lay, laid, laid: principal parts of the verb which means “ to put (place) down, or in position.” “I shall lay the rug”.” I laid the rug.”” I have laid the rug.” Lay is a transitive verb: that is, it takes an object..

Lie, lay lain: principal parts of the verb which means “ to recline or response.” “ She will lie in the hammock.” “ She is lying in the hammock.” “ She lay in he hammock.” “ She lay in the hammock yesterday.” “ She has lain there all afternoon.” Lie is an intransitive verb; it never takes an object.”

Is he kidding? Is it that “lay” means for example to place something on the floor? “ lie” means not to say the truth? (I know it means that) And “lie also means to place something on the floor? Please explain. Thanks a lot, bye.
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AnonymousHi, I was doing a search on common mistakes in English an I found this text:

“ Two very easily confused words. Lay, laid, laid: principal parts of the verb which means “ to put (place) down, or in position.” “I shall lay the rug”.” I laid the rug.”” I have laid the rug.” Lay is a transitive verb: that is, it takes an object..

Lie, lay lain: principal parts of the verb which means “ to recline or response.” “ She will lie in the hammock.” “ She is lying in the hammock.” “ She lay in he hammock.” “ She lay in the hammock yesterday.” “ She has lain there all afternoon.” Lie is an intransitive verb; it never takes an object.”

Is he kidding? Is it that “lay” means for example to place something on the floor? “ lie” means not to say the truth? (I know it means that) Yes, it means to say something other than the truth. Of course, it has nothing to do with the lie/lay question. And “lie also means to place something on the floor? Please explain. Thanks a lot, bye.
"Lie" does not mean to place something on the floor.
AnonymousHi, I was doing a search on common mistakes in English an I found this text:

“ Two very easily confused words. Lay, laid, laid: principal parts of the verb which means “ to put (place) down, or in position.” “I shall lay the rug”.” I laid the rug.”” I have laid the rug.” Lay is a transitive verb: that is, it takes an object..

Lie, lay lain: principal parts of the verb which means “ to recline or response.” “ She will lie in the hammock.” “ She is lying in the hammock.” “ She lay in he hammock.” “ She lay in the hammock yesterday.” “ She has lain there all afternoon.” Lie is an intransitive verb; it never takes an object.”

Hi,
I heard that natives are confused about that too, but I don't understand... how?
Do they make mistakes when they have to spell those words, or also when they say them? What are they confused about?
Thanks Emotion: smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
What are they confused about?

They think that when they say or hear

I was very tired, so I lay down for a while to rest.

they are saying or hearing

I was very tired, so I laid down for a while to rest

because they sound the same.

But they're not!

Is that confusing enough for you? Emotion: smile

CJ
Because the simple past of "to lie" is "lay," the bare infinitive and primary form of "to lay." And the "I have lain" form throws us all - it's not used much, but "laid" is heard often, so we want to use "laid" when "lain" is correct. Not many of our verb forms take the -n ending when the verb itself doesnt end in -n. Sewn, lain, worn.... and even with sewn, you'll also hear "have sewed," which is listed as an alternative.

I have no trouble with lie and lay in the present, but I have to stop and think when I go to the past or present perfect to make sure I have the correct form of the verb.
Thanks! I really don't understand the problem, but thanks, lol Emotion: smile
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KooyeenThanks! I really don't understand the problem, but thanks, lol Emotion: smile

One is regular, the other is not. When both verbs share a form, it makes it confusing.