+0
If I'm asking someone to lie down, should I say:

Please lay down or Please lie down?
1 2
Comments  
Thanks!
Lie down.

You lay [something else] down.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
But in the dictionary it also has lay?

It writes lie, lay, lying, lain.

eg:To be or place oneself at rest in a flat, horizontal, or recumbent position; recline:
He lay under a tree to sleep
What were you doing a few hours ago?

I lay in bed...? It sounds so awkward, doesn't it?
Lay and Lie are very confusing -- to native speakers as well as English learners. If you type them both into the search box, you will find many earlier threads about these verbs.

Part of the confusion is because Lay and Lie are two different verbs, but lay is also the past tense of lie. In your original question in this thread, you asked if you should tell someone to lay down or lie down. The answer is "lie down." The sentence you quoted from the dictionary (he lay under a tree to sleep) is in the past tense. If you were using the present tense, you would say "he lies under a tree to sleep" or "he is lying under a tree to sleep."

Does that help any? If not, check out the earlier threads I mentioned.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
What were you doing a few hours ago?

I lay in bed...? It sounds so awkward, doesn't it?

What about the sentence above?

Thanks
pleasehelp
What were you doing a few hours ago?

I lay in bed...? It sounds so awkward, doesn't it?


It doesn't sound awkward to me, but, as I said, many native speakers have trouble with "lay" and "lie." In this case, you could use the same verb form that was used in the question, ("What were you doing a few hours ago?") and reply "I was lying in bed." Does that sound less awkward to you?
Thanks a milli...

I appreciate all y'alls help...

What really truly frustrates me is that I speak natively but I don't understand grammar whatsoever! It gets quite irritating.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more