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Simple Life, Free Spirit

Midnight, December 3, 2004, I was wandering on the net, and suddenly I saw the name "Chen Shengshen" flash by my eyes... Well, I found out the photo that I had it taken with Mr.Chen two years ago when as a reporter I visited him, putting it in the very middle of the bookshelf. The background of the photo is a wall, a round quartz clock hanging there, with its hands pointing to the moment: 1:13:04PM, April 5, 2002.
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It was midnight on December 3rd, 2004. While wandering the net, I suddenly saw the name "Chen Sheng-shen" flash by my eyes. Two years before, as a reporter, I had visited him. I saw the photo that had been taken then, the same photo that I'd put on my bookshelf. In the picture was a round clock, its hands indicating 1:13PM, the very moment on April 5th, 2002 that we had last been together.
An alternative version:

Simple Life, Free Spirit

Midnight, December 3, 2004. I was surfing the net, when suddenly I saw the name "Chen Shengshen" flash before my eyes...Well, I soon dug out the photo I'd had taken with Mr.Chen two years before, when I visited him as a reporter, and put it in the very middle of the bookshelf. The background of the photo was a wall, with a round quartz clock hanging there. Its hands pointed to the moment: 1:13:04PM, April 5, 2002.

(I haven't changed the date and time, but it seems it must be a digital clock, to say so much; so you may have to lose the 'hands'.)

MrP
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Thank you taiwandave and MrP

MrP, should " I'd had taken with Mr.Chen" be " I'd taken with Mr.Chen"?

And, as what you've pointed out, I rewrote "with a round quartz clock hanging there. Its hands pointed to the moment: 1:13:04PM, April 5, 2002." as "with a round quartz clock hanging there, which clearly shows the moment: 1:13:04PM, April 5, 2002."

I think I could not use "pointed to", because a digtal clock has no minute or hour hand. And I think using present tense "shows" might be more accurate and better.

Do you agree with me?

PS. I really appreciated the usage "dug out"!
Ah! I may have misunderstood, Jobb. Sorry.

1. If you yourself took the picture, when you visited him as a reporter, you would say '...I'd taken of Mr Chen'.

2. If someone else took the picture, and you're in it, you would say '...I'd had taken of Mr Chen and me'.

But I think you meant (1).

I would myself use the past tense of 'show', as the showing of the time is frozen in the past. The main narrative itself is in the past too; unless after the last sentence you're planning to use the present tense throughout, for vividness.

MrP
What I referred to is 2:

2. If someone else took the picture, and you're in it, you would say '...I'd had taken of Mr Chen and me'.

But I don't understand the grammar of "I'd had taken" -- "I had had taken"? What grammar is it?
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Hello Jobb

'To have something done (by someone else)' is 'to get something done (by someone else)', 'to make arrangements for something to be done (by someone else)', e.g.

'I had/ my hair/ cut.'
'I had/ my house/ painted.'

In your example, the 'someone else' is the photographer. The grammar is ['to have' + object + past participle].

(This differs from the past perfect, where the subject is the acting party:

'I had cut/ my hair.'
'I had painted/ my house.')

So your example can be parsed as:

the photo = first part of object phrase

[that] = implicit

I had had = past perfect of 'to have' (the action of taking the photo precedes the action of the narrative)

taken = past participle

of Mr C and me = last part of object phrase

i.e. 'the photo (I had had/ taken) of Mr C and me'

MrP
That is perfect. Emotion: big smile