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Hello guys

I'm in trouble with a sentence in [url=http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/01/AR2006050101272.html ]Washington Post's article "A Passage to Harvard"[/url].

The sentence is :
"Life that is, in this case, more engaging, more nuanced and ultimately more disturbing than art."
How should I interpret this "life that is"? Is the "that" a relative? Or should I interpret the phrase is made by fronting "life" in "that is life"? I would to like hear your opinions.

paco
Comments  
Life which is more engaging, more nuanced, etc
Marius HancuLife which is more engaging, more nuanced, etc
Hi, Marius

Thanks for the quick reply. Do you mean this sentence is made up of only a single noun modified by a clause?

paco
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...weeping inconsolably and trying to look at life ahead.

Life that is, in this case, more engaging, more nuanced and ultimately more disturbing than art. And Viswanathan, perhaps, has learned a lesson that the admissions industrial complex does its best to obscure: There are more things to cry about than not getting into Harvard.

I would read "Life" as a restatement of the preceding "life", and "that" as a defining relative pronoun:

"...weeping inconsolably and trying to look at life ahead – life that is more engaging, more nuanced and ultimately more disturbing than art, in this case."

MrP

MrPedanticI would read "Life" as a restatement of the preceding "life", and "that" as a defining relative pronoun:

"...weeping inconsolably and trying to look at life ahead – life that is more engaging, more nuanced and ultimately more disturbing than art, in this case."Hello MrP

Thank you for the opinion. So I feel the writing style here is of abnormally elaborate rhetoric. Am I right?

paco
Well, it does seem to be a fairly common trick, in some kinds of journalism: putting your relative pronoun in one paragraph, and its referent in another.

MrP
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MrPedanticWell, it does seem to be a fairly common trick, in some kinds of journalism: putting your relative pronoun in one paragraph, and its referent in another.

MrP
Thank you, again! I see.

paco