+0
Which is correct, "He lighted up the candles", or "He lit up the candles"?

What is the difference between, "He pulled at the rope" and "He pulled the rope"?
+0
Candles may be lit. A dining room may be lit up.
So, in the first example, neither is correct. I would say, "He lit the candles."
In the second example, both are possible.
"He pulled at the rope." - this would mean he gave the rope a tug (a brief pull).
"He pulled the rope." - this would mean a steady or longer pull on the rope.
+0
I would guess that many of these examples of 'lighted' are from older books (Wuthering Heights was published in 1847 or with 'lighted' used directly in front of a noun - a lighted candle.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
1 2
Comments  
The verb "light" is irregular.

He lights the candles in the window every evening when it gets dark. ("light" is present tense.)
He lit the candles in the window last night. ("lit" is past tense.)

The phrasal verb "light up" =
1 ) glow to ignite a cigarette, cigar, etc.

His face lights up every time he sees his best friend.

2) to ignite a cigarette, cigar, etc.
Every fifteen minutes he goes outside and lights up. He is addicted to cigarettes.
In the book 'Wuthering Heights' there is a sentence-"At length I resolved on making an excuse to ask if they would have the candles lighted." But you said that the past tense of light is lit .Many times I come across such tenses with the word lighted.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
 fivejedjon's reply was promoted to an answer.
fatimah0786But you said that the past tense of light is lit .Many times I come across such tenses with the word lighted.
In the sense of "set on fire," the past tense is "lit."
In the sense of "glow" or "illuminate," the past tense is regular.

English has several examples of verbs with two forms of the past tense.

Shine:
The sun shone brightly that day.
He shined his shoes once a week.

Hang:
The ornaments were hung on the Christmas tree on Christmas eve.
The man was hanged for murder.

In talking about a person: if I say, "When I entered her hospital room, her face lightened up (or her face lit up)?

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Her face lit up.

apple tile

In talking about a person: if I say, "When I entered her hospital room, her face lightened up (or her face lit up)?

Her face lit up would mean that her expression showed that she was very pleased to see you.

Her face lightened up might suggest that she stopped frowning, or that her skin became lighter in color (perhaps her tan faded).

Show more