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Q1. Are the following 2 sentences correct? If so, what's the difference?

A: "Oh, you've come from G valley. Was the weather bad over there?" "Yes, very bad. It was raining hard. It'll be like that soon."

B: "Oh, you've come from G valley. Was the weather bad over there?" "Yes, very bad. It was raining hard. It'll be like this soon."

I think B is a bit strange, because "like this" means nearness to the person who said, "Yes, very bad. ---." Am I right?

Q2.

A: When I have enough money to buy books, I don't have enough time to read them. And when I have enough time to read books, I don't have enough money to buy them. It's like that all the time.

B: When I have enough money to buy books, I don't have enough time to read them. And when I have enough time to read books, I don't have enough money to buy them. It's like this all the time.

I think in B the speaker feels his usual experiences as close to himself, and see them subjectively, while in A he sees them objectively or impersonally. Is my explanation right?
Or should I avoid such a psychological approach?
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Q1. Are the following 2 sentences correct? If so, what's the difference?

A: "Oh, you've come from G valley. Was the weather bad over there?" "Yes, very bad. It was raining hard. It'll be like that soon."

B: "Oh, you've come from G valley. Was the weather bad over there?" "Yes, very bad. It was raining hard. It'll be like this soon."

I think B is a bit strange, because "like this" means nearness to the person who said, "Yes, very bad. ---." Am I right? In A, it sounds like the rain in G Valley will soon be where they are now - it would be clarified with the addition of the word here. It'll be like that [rain] here soon. In B, it's possible that he means that whatever whether they are having where they are now will make its way to G Valley - but it's not clear. Context could possibly help, but something like "Soon, though, it will be like this over there" would make it a bit more clear.

Q2.

A: When I have enough money to buy books, I don't have enough time to read them. And when I have enough time to read books, I don't have enough money to buy them. It's like that all the time.

B: When I have enough money to buy books, I don't have enough time to read them. And when I have enough time to read books, I don't have enough money to buy them. It's like this all the time.

I think in B the speaker feels his usual experiences as close to himself, and see them subjectively, while in A he sees them objectively or impersonally. Is my explanation right?
Or should I avoid such a psychological approach?
I'm getting old I guess. What's the difference between A and B?
--- Sorry I miswrote sample sentences of Q 1. I forgot to write "here" The correct sample is:

A: "Oh, you've come from G valley. Was the weather bad over there?" "Yes, very bad. It was raining hard. It'll be like that here soon."

B: "Oh, you've come from G valley. Was the weather bad over there?" "Yes, very bad. It was raining hard. It'll be like this here soon."

I understand your explanation of A. Please give a second thought to B. (Is B correct?)

Do you mean A and B in Q 2. are the same in meaning?
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I mean in Q2 I can't find the difference in the words you used? What's different? Could you put it in bold to help?
-I think I was wrong. Probably "like this" and "like that" are the same in meaning when used in general terms.

By the way, is B in Q 1. (my corrected version) correct?

B: "Oh, you've come from G valley. Was the weather bad over there?" "Yes, very bad. It was raining hard. It'll be like this here soon."
No, you need to say "It'll be like that [how it was in G valley] here soon." Using "this" means what's happening here. Using "that" means the weather there.
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Hi, Grammar Greek. Thank you very much.