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Hello Forum,

Would you please explain to me the rules regarding usage of the word 'like'? The forum might have had several discussions about this topic. Your guidance is greatly appreciated. Besides, Are the following sentences grammatically correct?

(1) It looks like a monster.

(2) It looks like Jon will quite his job soon.

(3) It looks like he has gone already.

(4) It looks weird.
Comments  
I think these four sentences are all correct!

"look like" is a phrasal verb.
Yes, so do I. In 1,2 and 3, "look like" can be rewritten as "seem".
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Thanks, Pieanne and Cateran.

(1) What is the difference between 'seems like' and 'looks like'?

(2) When does 'like' can take only an object? I am struggling in this area. Help with a few examples please.
Hi Krish again

(1) The beast looks like a monster.
You can rephrase it as "The beast looks as if (it were) a monster" or "The beast seems like a monster". These sentences say that the beast resembles a monster in the appearance, not saying that the animal is a monster. On the other hand, if you say "The beast looks (to be) a monster" or "The beast seems (to be) a monster", you mean "I think the beast is a monster".

(2) It looks like he will quit his job soon.
You can rephrase it as "It looks as if he will quit his job soon" or "It seems (that) he will quit his job soon". Informally you can say also "It seems like he will quit his job soon". In this last sentence, "like" has no meaning. It is used just as a filler to smooth the speech.

paco
When you want to express "the appearance of sth or sb resembles the appearance of another",

you shoud use "look like". For example,

(1) "She looks like his father.".

When you want to express "to be probable that", you can use "look like + clause" or "seem ". For example,

(1) It's looks like we'll be late.

(2) It seems that he is lying.

In my opinion, "seem like + noun" is better than "seem like + clause". For example,

(1) It seems like years since we last met.
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(2) When does 'like' can take only an object? I am struggling in this area. Help with a few examples please.

When "like" is a preposition, it can take only an object. For example,

(1) There's no place like home.

(2) I wish I could swim like a dolphin.
Thanks Paco2004 and Cateran for your explanations. The summary of my understanding:

(1) 'Look like' should take either an object or a clause.

(2) 'Seem' should take 'that' + a clause.

(3) 'Seems like should take a noun, and "'seems like' + clause" is not a formal usage.
(2) 'Seem' should take 'that' + a clause.

In addition, "seem" has the following usages:

(1)seem (to be) + adjective or noun

Her father seems a kind man or Her father seems to be a kind man.

She seems sad or She seems to be sad.

(2) seem + to do

He seems to know everything.

Of course, the last sentence can be rewrittem as "It seems that he knows everything".

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