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I want your help .What is the difference between two sentences
She likes studying
She likes to study.
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Hello, Serdar,

"she likes studying" simply states that she likes that activity in general, it's one of her characteristics.

As "she likes to do something", I think, is used to refer to a more occasional activity, your second sentence requires a specification, for instance :"she likes to study in the garden", or you could say "she'd like to study with me"

This has already been discussed, and maybe others will come to correct me.
Hello Serdar

I am an English learner from Japan. Nice to talk with you here.

As Pieanne already said, we had discussed the issue you raised several times and I learned a lot about it. I think Pieanne's answer is perfect, and so I have little to add. However, if you don't mind, let me out my two cents.

I had been taught in school that in British English "like to study" is used to state the subject's occasional emotion, but it seems untrue. But I learned here that even British people don't feel any difference in meaning between "she likes studying" and "she likes to study"; both are saying just "studying is one of activities she likes".

However, there seem some differences in the usage between the two collocations.
[1] When you want to express your occasional emotion that you would like to do something, use "I would like to do" rather than "I would like doing".
(o) I would like to study this afternoon.
(x) I would like studying this afternoon.
[2] Personally I feel the infinitive clauses are preferred to gerundive clauses when the predication told in the clause is complex and long.
(o) She likes to study alone in her room in night rather than with friends in the library in afternoon.
(?) She likes studying alone in her room in night rather than with friends in the library in afternoon.

paco
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I have joined the forums recently and missed the discussion about like+infinitive/gerund that Paco and Pieanne mention.

I just wanted to add something. The use of the infinitive may have a diffferent meaning.

INFINITIVE= you like something because you consider it is good for you

"I like to go to the dentist once a year."
"We like to wash up as soon as we finish eating. Then we can sit and relax"

(I don't think people in general enjoy going to the dentis or washing up)

GERUND= you simply enjoy this activity

"I like singing in the shower."
Hello Maripinky

Nice to talk with you here.
INFINITIVE= you like something because you consider it is good for you
"I like to go to the dentist once a year."
"We like to wash up as soon as we finish eating. Then we can sit and relax"


I think we'd rather say "I'd like to do" and "we'd like to do" in these cases. No??

paco
Nice to see you here too, Paco. I always find your comments on this forum very interesting.

I think "I'd like to do something" refers to a particular moment. My examples of like+infinitive imply that I/we like to do those things in general, usually.

Consider these examples:

"I like to get up early and clean the house before going to work." (I think this is something good in general, I don't enjoy it ... at least I don't)

"On Sundays I like getting up late." (I enjoy it in general)

"I'd like to get up early tomorrow, please wake me up at 7." (a particulart occasion)
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Hello Maripinky
"I like to get up early and clean the house before going to work." (I think this is something good in general)


I see what you mean.
Yes, "like to do" is better than "like doing" in the case the subject feels the habit of "doing" is a good thing for him/her.
(EX) She likes to go for a walk on Sundays.

paco
Thank you Maripinky and Paco for all your input!
And then it's the same of course for that kind of thing:
"I like to think she'll remember my advice"
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