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Hi to all the English experts,

I saw quite a few nouns with a -line ending or appear in a compound noun.

1. day line - what does line mean here?

2. night line, such as night line news - what does line mean here?

3. lifeline - what does line mean here?

4. A company called 'Priceline'. what does line mean here?

5. on-line access.

6. assembly line.

7. streamline

Thanks,

Note: Doesn't a 'line' originally mean a string or a row? I wonder if you know the reasons why
the word line is so used.
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Comments  
Bottom line

sideline

headline

by-line (by E. M. Forster, by Charles Dickens)

redline

skyline
Doesn't a 'line' originally mean a string or a row?


Yes, it does, Guest, and if you think a bit, you should be able to see how a string, an attenuated binding or connecting device, relates to the meanings of all your words. Think of both the shape and the function of a 'line'.
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Hi Mr. M. or other Englishpros,

I'm still puzzled with your enlightenment. Please elaborate on your viewpoints more.

1. day line - what does line mean here?
Do you consider day as a line? like considering time as a line, such as time line?

2. night line, such as night line news - what does line mean here?
Do you consider night as a line? like considering time as a line, such as time line?

3. lifeline - what does line mean here?
Do you consider line as a cord that can save others' lives?

4. A company called 'Priceline'. what does line mean here?
I have no idea. What do you think?

5. on-line access.
Do you mean the Inter-networking has millions of lines connected?

6. assembly line.
Do you mean a factory has long rows for assembling parts?

7. streamline
Here line probably means curve lines, in short, curves. What do you think?

Bottom line
well, probably you can imagine there's a line in the lowest acceptable situation.

sideline
- a line marking the side areas of play, especially for football

headline
A row of large-sized text at the top of an article

by-line (by E. M. Forster, by Charles Dickens)
a line at the top of a newspaper or magazine article giving the writer's name

redline
I thought it was a noun, but it turned out to be a verb after looking up a dictionary.
redline
• verb N. Amer. informal
1 drive with (the car engine) at its maximum rpm. 2 refuse (a loan or insurance) to someone due to their area of residence.
— ORIGIN from the use of red as a limit marker, in sense 2 a ring marking part of a map.

skyline
- an outline of land and buildings defined against the sky.

Thanks,
Good morning, Meantolearn. Thanks for registering at English Forums.

I think you have done a good job of examining the 'line' meanings. Some comments:

(1) I don't have any idea what 'day line' means 'here', because you have supplied no context. Googling 'day line' produces several possibilities, for instance the name of a railway line.

(2) 'Night line', as in the news, came from, I believe, the days when news was received by telegraph.

(3) 'Lifeline' is what they throw you if you fall off a ship. It has a life preserver tied to its end.

(4) It's a company name, so you will have to ask them. A product line? A telephone line to get a good price?

(6) An assembly 'line' is a line of workers, each adding a part when the product rolls past on a conveyor belt.

(8) The bottom line is the last line of numerals in an added list: the total.

It looks like you've got all the others figured out. You did well-- and that's no line!
Hi Mr. M.,

Thank you so much for your help. I appreciate your 'enlightenment'.

(8) The bottom line has its figurative meaning
- the most important fact in a situation:
e.g. The bottom line is that we need another ten thousand dollars to complete the project.

at the end you wrote:
"It looks like you've got all the others figured out. You did well-- and that's no line!"

What do you mean by 'no line'??? What does line mean here?

Thanks,
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OK, Mr. Micawber. You got yourself into it, now let's see you get yourself out of it! Emotion: smile

I presume you meant "That's no line of bull!" ?

CJ
Yes indeed-- I signed off with benevolence aforethought, Meantolearn, and Jim has already supplied one example, a 'line of bull'. A 'line' here, like an actor's lines (each actor's speech starts on a new line of the paper), are prepared comments intended to convince the listener, and usually used with less than honest intent.

A 'line of bull' is simply a well-rehearsed lie or stupidity ('***' is 'a common English expletive meaning "humbug" or "nonsense." It implies that the purveyor of alleged nonsense is willfully lying, or that he/she is speaking boldly from ignorance')

Wooers often feed their lovers 'a line'-- deceitful expressions of infatuation. Salesman have 'lines'-- otherwise called sales pitches-- with which they convince unwary housewives to buy cemetery plots and stove brushes.

All these lines come from a line of words, strung like glass beads on a necklace to attract the easily duped; or from a fishing line to lure a black bass to its doom.
What does b.s. stand for?

- bachelor of science
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