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Hello,

Could you please help me which of the following are correct?

A. The line is breaking. I could hardly hear you.
B. The line is breaking out. I could hardly hear you.
C. The line is breaking up. I could hardly hear you.

D. You are breaking. I could hardly hear you.
E. You are breaking out. I could hardly hear you.
F. You are breaking up. I could hardly hear you.

If two or more each set are possible, is there any difference between them?
On the side, can I use 'can' instead of 'could'? Do they express the same meaning?
Can I also use "can't" or "couldn't" above without changing the meaning?

Thank you for your assistance.
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Here's what you need at the time you are experiencing this difficulty:

The line is breaking up. I can hardly hear you.

When talking about this incident later:

The line was breaking up. I could hardly hear you.

The other versions you suggested are not right.

CJ
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Thank you for your response. I really appreciate that.

What about the following, is this acceptable?
At least in casual conversation, can we use this as I sometimes hear people say "You are..." instead of "The line is..."?

You are breaking up. I can hardly hear you.

Incidentally, do "can't hardly" and "can hardly" mean exactly the same thing? If not, are they subtly different?
Hi,
A,The line is breaking, I can hardly hear you......((According to time agreement)).
B,The line is breaking out(start suddenly), I can hardly hear you.......(the meaning is different to the situation)
C,The line is breaking up(become weak), I can hardly hear you.

1- hardly makes the sentence negative so can't is wrong.
2-D,E,F are strange to me,maybe they are some interllingual errors.
Hi,as I explained "HARDLY" makes the sentence mostly(%95) negative.So I can't hardly is wrong.and "you are breaking" can probably be used in casual conversation as you said ,but I think it's just a trasnfer of mother tongue(interlingual error)
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Thank you, earlybird, for sharing your thoughts on this. It's becoming clearer to me now with what you've explained.

CJ,

As a native speaker, would you agree with earlybird?
Could you please comment as well on my additional questions earlier?
Is "breaking" without "up" in the given context also acceptable?

Thank you.
AnonymousAs a native speaker, would you agree with earlybird?
I agree that can't hardly and couldn't hardly is wrong.
AnonymousIs "breaking" without "up" in the given context also acceptable?
No.
AnonymousCould you please comment as well on my additional questions earlier?
I thought I had. I wrote, "The other versions you suggested are not right."

CJ
Hi,

Your explanation is quite true both about "breaking without up" and the other form of "you are breaking"
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Thank you, CJ and earlybird, for your explanations. I now completely understand the topic.
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