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hi, i work a beginning editor for the university of washington. i've seen several academic manuscripts that use the phrase "lines of evidence." while the phrase is technically correct, it sounds awkward and ambiguous to me.

e.g. Two lines of evidence support the involvement of the PARK10 genetic region...

actually, i think that it's the "line of" that I object to...

e.g. This is a new line of research for... (i'd change this to 'area of' or some other synonym)

soooo...i'd like to caution my investigators to avoid the phrase, but can't think of anything more informative. any suggestions?

-andrew
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It's quite a common phrase, in discussions of genetics, etc. – there are 1,320,000 googles for "lines of evidence" + gene, for instance.

(Perhaps it could be taken as the counterpart of "lines of inquiry".)

MrP
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Phooey, indeed. Emotion: smile I, too, feel there is something odd about that phrase, without being able to articulate it clearly.
CJ
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Comments  
>>>>> e.g. Two lines of evidence support the involvement of the PARK10 genetic region...

actually, i think that it's the "line of" that I object to...

This may very well be the terminology of that particular line of work. I think it sounds ok......
 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.
phooey. okay, i'll leave it...
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.