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Hi,

Does somebody know the expression used to indicate a continuous development along a coast? You know, when coastal cities grow so much that you cannot distinguish anymore where the boundary is, and there is no undeveloped land between them.

I was under the impression that it had something to do with stripes, or ribbons, but I didn't find anything on Google Emotion: sad

Thanks in advance!
Comments  
Hi,

If you want a big word, you might perhaps call it a 'connurbation'.

In everyday English, you might say 'a built-up strip along the coast'.

Best wishes, Clive
Ribbon-development does spring to mind in this reagrd, but I don't think it captures the concept of nearby towns being swallowed up by a bigger, expanding, neighbour. It's happening along the east coast of Ireland as Dublin, pretty much in the centre of the east coast, expands into Bray and Arklow to the south and Drogheda and Dundalk to the north - as well as westwards into the island. We just refer to it as 'urban sprawl' - but that too misses your point.
I can't quite put my finger on the phrase you're looking for at the moment, but I'll come back to you when I do.
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A coastal urban agglomeration?
Hi,

Thank you all for these suggestions!

I think that "conurbation," "sprawl" and "agglomeration" are too general (I mean, they could be used also for non-coastal areas and they do not refer to the shape), the others seem very good to me.

Also, I managed to find the book were I read the expression I was trying to recall. Here's the sentence:

A result can be urban strip development as tentacles of urban sprawl spread monotonously up and down the coast from urban centres. Ultimately, cities hundreds of kilometres apart can become joined, effectively becoming one coastal 'megacity.'

I have another question, though ...

Would you say 'urban strip development' or just 'strip development' can be understood without this long explanation? Does it sound natural to you? (the authors of the book are native speakers from the US).

Thanks!!!
Hi,

Would you say 'urban strip development' or just 'strip development' can be understood without this long explanation? Does it sound natural to you?

I think you need some explanation of the nature and scale of what you are talking about. eg 'Strip development' can just refer to the development of a 500 metre strip of land beside a road.

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveI think you need some explanation of the nature and scale of what you are talking about. eg 'Strip development' can just refer to the development of a 500 metre strip of land beside a road.

Thanks, I didn't think of that! One way or the other, it seems I'll need more than just two words to explain this idea Emotion: sad
[color=blue]Urban subsumption[/color] - there's a term to conjure with Emotion: big smile
It's just occurred to me, I've never of heard it before and yet it covers the concept nicely, if I say so myself.
What a funny post ... if I quote it, it looks the way it should be, without all those funny thingies
Eviltony[color=blue]Urban subsumption[/color] - there's a term to conjure with Emotion: big smile
It's just occurred to me, I've never of heard it before and yet it covers the concept nicely, if I say so myself.
Seems nice, but ... are you sure it would be understood? Never heard of that, either.

Thank you!
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