+0

Advanced Grammar in Use: Third Edition by Martin Hewings, Published by Cambridge Press, Copyright 2015, Unit 21 page 42.


When an adjective or noun phrase is used after a verb to describe the subject or say what or who the subject is, the adjective or noun phase is a complement and the verb is a linking verb.

. . .

When they are used as linking verbs come and grow (e.g. come to know, grow thoughtful) can't be followed by a noun phrase.

. . ,

After the verbs come, get, and grow (but not after became) we can use a to-infinitive. Come and grow are often used to talk about gradual change.

  • I eventually came / grew to appreciate his work. (not . . . became to appreciate his work.)

Note: I added the last section above starting "After the verbs come . . ." after I had initially posted this question. I am not sure that I understand the prior section. I think what the author is saying is that either a to-infinitive phrase follows come / grow or an adjective. Perhaps a few extra explanatory notes would help.

  • I grew tired after watching the boring movie.
  • I grew to like her after she helped me with my assignment.
  • I came to understand his eccentric behavior.
  • I came (adjective) (I can't think of one.)

Can someone (CalifJim) please give a few examples using come and grow as linking verbs to demonstrate why they can't be followed by a noun phrase?

+0
MountainHikerWhen an adjective or noun phrase is used after a verb to describe the subject or say what or who the subject is, the adjective or noun phase is a complement and the verb is a linking verb.

sbj = subject
lkv = linking verb
cmp = complement
AP = adjective phrase
NP = noun phrase

[The teachers]sbj [are]lkv [smart]APcmp.
[Our manager]sbj [is]lkv [a woman]NPcmp.

MountainHikerWhen they are used as linking verbs come and grow (e.g. come to know, grow thoughtful) can't be followed by a noun phrase.

Actually, while that may be true of grow, it's not true of come.

[The plan]sbj [came]lkv [a cropper]NPcmp. (The plan was a failure.)

(come a cropper : to fail completely)

MountainHikerdemonstrate why they can't be followed by a noun phrase

I don't think this negative claim can be proved. The conclusion "can't be followed by a noun phrase" is based solely on the fact that the neither the author (nor, supposedly, anybody else either) has been able to find that sort of example. That is, as far as I know, there is no theory of syntax that can prove such a thing. It's a matter of usage.


I don't see 'come' as a linking verb in 'come to know'. In my opinion, 'to know' doesn't describe the subject or say what or who the subject is. This is a catenative construction.

My opinion is the same for 'grow' followed by an infinitive.

MountainHikerI think what the author is saying is that either a to-infinitive phrase or an adjective phrase follows come / grow. or an adjective.

Yes. That's how I too would interpret it.

MountainHiker
  • I grew tired after watching the boring movie.
  • I grew to like her after she helped me with my assignment.
  • I came to understand his eccentric behavior.
  • I came (adjective) (I can't think of one.)

Your examples are fine.

As for the last, there probably aren't many, but here's one:

I didn't win, but sbj [came]lkv [close]APcmp.

CJ

Comments  

As a curiosity, "come" can be followed by a noun or noun phrase in the usage such as "Don't come the wise-guy with me!"

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Thank you for your response.

I don't think it fits this following pattern, though: When an adjective or noun phrase is used after a verb to describe the subject or say what or who the subject is, the adjective or noun phase is a complement and the verb is a linking verb.

Perhaps I am incorrect?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
MountainHiker

When an adjective or noun phrase is used after a verb to describe the subject or say what or who the subject is, the adjective or noun phase is a complement and the verb is a linking verb.

Perhaps I am incorrect?

You are correct: the NP or AdjP is predicative complement of the verb concerned.

"Come" and "grow"require an AdjP as predicative complement, but not an NP.

It comes open. Ed came third. It came true.

She grew tall. Kim grew old. You grow more beautiful each day.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
MountainHiker

Thank you for your response.

I don't think it fits this following pattern, though: When an adjective or noun phrase is used after a verb to describe the subject or say what or who the subject is, the adjective or noun phase is a complement and the verb is a linking verb.

Perhaps I am incorrect?

I think a good case can be made that "come" in "Don't come the wise-guy with me!" is a linking verb.