How would you properly say these naturally?

- I like it more when my smoothie is thick than liquidy.

- The more milk you add to the flour, the less you have to stir for it to go from a thick to a liquid form/state./to reach a liquid form/state.

Thank you
Hi,

How would you properly say these naturally?

- I like it more when my smoothie is thick than liquidy. . . . . than watery. ('Watery' can mean 'too thin in consistency'.)

- The more milk you add to the flour, the less you have to stir for it to go from a thick to a liquid form/state./to reach a liquid form/state.

I don't cook, but I'd say

The more milk you add to the flour, the less you have to stir it.

The more milk you add to the flour, the less you have to stir for it to dissolve.

Clive
Thank you for your answer,

How would you say this sentence please?

You have to heat it to 100 degrees for to go from a solid to a liquid state/form.

Thank you
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Hi,

How would you say this sentence please?

You have to heat it to 100 degrees for to go from a solid to a liquid state/form.

Probably

You have to heat it to 100 degrees to dissolve it / make it dissolve.

It might depend a bit on what you are heating, and on where you are doing it (eg in a kitchen? eg in a laboratory?).

Clive
Ok,

I'm trying to use "liquid state or luquid form" in a sentence, how would you use it

Like "for mercury to go from a solid to a liquid form/state, you need to heat it."

Thank you
Hi,

Yes, that's OK. Those kind of terms sound as if you are talking in a scientific context.

Clive
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Is the sentence structure ok, starting with For and which would you use Form or state?

Thanks
Hi,

Is the sentence structure ok, starting with For Yes

and which would you use Form or state? Both sound equally OK to me as everyday English, but I expect there is a scientific difference.

Clive