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Dear Sir or Madam,

I need to find out the correct words to end this sentence with:

The trauma wan't as unique as she thinks it is, with the numerous examples we can see in 19th or 20th Century essays on it.

The question is on 'essays on it' or the alternate 'literary analyses.'

Whilst the latter sounds somewhat nicer, it doesn't reflect the pyschological analyses that is being referred to very well.

Thanks.
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AnonymousDear Sir or Madam,

I need to find out the correct words to end this sentence with:

The trauma wan't as unique as she thinks it is, with the numerous examples we can see in 19th or 20th Century essays on it.

The question is on 'essays on it' or the alternate 'literary analyses.'

Whilst the latter sounds somewhat nicer, it doesn't reflect the pyschological analyses that is being referred to very well.

Thanks.
Either ending is OK grammatically.

Are you looking for something that is factually true?

It's very hard to suggest something with such vague information. There were many essays as well as literary analyses written during those two centuries!
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In talking about the trauma that the woman is referring to, it's the psychological works of the two centuries in question.

So would it be better to say:

The trauma isn't as unique as she thinks it is, despite the numerous examples we can see in 19th or 20th Century psychological analyses that are available.
Maybe this is what you are looking for?

The trauma isn't as unique as she thinks it is, because of the numerous similar cases we can see in 19th or 20th Century psychological analyses.
Here we are diverging away from the case in point, and I apologise for any of the confusion that may incur.

It's grief, not trauma, that the lady was talking about. And grief isn't as communal as you would suppose. It's very individual. It's the reactions to it that vary so much, and make it so difficult to gauge.

I apologise. You're not a community center. But you're making me re-examine what I've written (in the literary sense).
Try out our live chat room.
With a sense of appreciation, here is what you've prompted me to write:

Grief isn't as unique as Underwood thinks it is, and the numerous examples that we can see in the 19th and 20th Century psychological analyses are a good example of this.

Thank you.