Hi all, I just finished "The Da Vinci Code" and enjoyed it. However, speaking as a layman, I noticed that the author frequently used a literary device whose name I'm seeking. Basically, it involves something being revealed to a character either through something realized or seen. Then to create suspense, the revelation or scene that was witnessed is revealed to the reader much later.

If anyone is aware of another term for this device other than simply being creating suspense, please elucidate me.
Thanks,
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Hi all, I just finished "The Da Vinci Code" and enjoyed it. However, speaking as a layman, I noticed that ... later. If anyone is aware of another term for this device other than simply being creating suspense, please elucidate me.

You posted this more than once.
I think you stunned us into silence by the idea that "literary" has anything to do with "The Da Vinci Code." What a potboiler.

Main Entry: pot·boil·er
Pronunciation:
Function: noun
Date: 1862
a usually inferior work (as of art or literature)
produced chiefly for profit
But sorry, I don't know if there is some term for the device of hiding something from the reader. "Delayed revelation," maybe that seems to be a phrase, anyway, and it fits.

Best wishes Donna Richoux
Hi all, I just finished "The Da Vinci Code" and ... device other than simply being creating suspense, please elucidate me.

You posted this more than once. I think you stunned us into silence by the idea that "literary" has anything ... of hiding something from the reader. "Delayed revelation," maybe that seems to be a phrase, anyway, and it fits.

My view would be that 'delayed revelation' fitted the structure of a mystery story more. Ellery Queen was good at this, and several of his books had a challenge to the reader about two-thirds of the way through along the lines of "OK folks, you have all the clues..."

DVC was so badly written that I can't recall any particular literary device, but in general the practice of deliberately creating suspense, usually at the end of chapters, and then going on in the next chapter to skip to another part of the story line, I'd call cliffhanging. It has to be done well to succeed.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire, England
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DVC was so badly written that I can't recall any particular literary device, but in general the practice of deliberately ... to skip to another part of the story line, I'd call cliffhanging. It has to be done well to succeed.

And then there's "foreshadowing."
Everyone seems to know that DVC was badly written. Could this be because everyone has read it? (Rhetorical exaggeration, folks. I'm not inviting a chorus of "*I* didn't"s.)
How 'bout that punctuation?

Liebs
Everyone seems to know that DVC was badly written. Could this be because everyone has read it? (Rhetorical exaggeration, folks. I'm not inviting a chorus of "*I* didn't"s.)

How about "I did"s? (It was loaned to me, with pressure, by a family member. Bother those unrequested loans!)
How 'bout that punctuation?

V. impressive.

SML
Donna Richoux:

Robin Bignall:
DVC was so badly written that I can't recall any particular literary device..

Bob Lieblich:
Everyone seems to know that DVC was badly written. Could this be because everyone has read it?

I read it. I liked it quite a lot. It was fun, light entertainment. I get tired of people dumping on it. And that's all I have to say about that.

Mark Brader "'A matter of opinion'(?) I have to say you are Toronto right. There('s) your opinion, which is wrong, (Email Removed) and mine, which is right." Gene Ward Smith
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Robert Lieblich put finger to keyboard in this fashion:
DVC was so badly written that I can't recall any ... call cliffhanging. It has to be done well to succeed.

And then there's "foreshadowing." Everyone seems to know that DVC was badly written. Could this be because everyone has read it? (Rhetorical exaggeration, folks. I'm not inviting a chorus of "*I* didn't"s.)

I am two-thirds of the way through Angels and Demons (which I think predates DVC). It is irritating me, being simplistic, childish and patronising to the reader. Having got this far I will finish it but I'm not sure I can stomach another novel by the same author.

David
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Donna Richoux: Robin Bignall: Bob Lieblich:

Everyone seems to know that DVC was badly written. Could this be because everyone has read it?

I read it. I liked it quite a lot. It was fun, light entertainment. I get tired of people dumping on it. And that's all I have to say about that.

I read it and found it better than some and worse than others. My general criticism was the improbability factor. Not the improbable plot, but the improbable things the characters did.

While it wasn't done in this book, I always think of a book that I read where two characters arranged to meet in NYC, but forgot to set a meeting place or time. They ran into one another on the street.

There was far too much of that type of improbability in TDC.

Every time I fly back to Orlando from somewhere I expect to see a familiar face in the airport. After all, I've lived here over 30 years, I know quite a few people who frequently take airplanes, and Orlando's airport is not that large. I never have seen a familiar face in the airport that wasn't the face of someone that I had arranged to pick me up.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Everyone seems to know that DVC was badly written. Could this be because everyone has read it? (Rhetorical exaggeration, folks. I'm not inviting a chorus of "*I* didn't"s.)

I haven't yet, but I want to, to see what all the fuss is about.
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