+0
Are you living on campus?

Is this sentence correct?
Comments  
Yes, that's correct.

"Do you live on campus?" is also correct.
May the preposition be "at" or "in" there?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
RuslanaMay the preposition be "at" or "in" there?

on/off campus is a fixed expression.

I am living on campus. This sentence implies that I am staying on campus on a temporary basis. It is not my home.
What do you mean by living on campus?

The campus means, for the best of my knowledge, a university or such a higher education institute and its surrounding area.

You can live on the money you received from ......

You can live on just eating only cassava.

You can live in a certain area.

I live in this area of the town; this the northern part of the town.

I don't write that I live on this area of the town.

What is living on campus?
Hello Rotter

"On campus" is a fixed expression, as Pinenut says. There are other similar expressions, e.g. "on site".

1. I have a room on campus.

— in British English, this means "I have a room in one of the university buildings". (You would usually take such a room for a year.)

2. Do you live on campus?

— this means "do you have a room in one of the university buildings?"

(The "on" goes with the "campus", rather than the "live". Thus "live on" in #2 isn't a phrasal verb.)

MrP
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Mr. Pedantic

I haven't heard this fixed expression before.

I know the word campus very well.
Hello Rotter

You would be most likely to hear "on campus" if you were in fact "on campus" at least some of the time (i.e. a student); it's much less common in the outside world.

It clocks up an astonishing 345 million googles. (I suppose students spend a lot of time online.)

MrP
Pinenuton/off campus is a fixed expression.
Thanks, Pinenut.
MrPedantic(I suppose students spend a lot of time online.)
For sure.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?