Hello!
My colleague at work asked me to publish a weekly report on a corporate web site. Upon completion I responded to her message with just "done!" in the message body. She replied me with "loads of thanks to you". Having never heard of such construction I tried to correct her thinkning of what she had really meant was "Lots of thanks" or "Thanks a lot". However I later received her point of view stating that:
(below there is a part of her message)


Ok
I'll try to explain u what I meant
my phrase that sounded like "loads of thanks" is equal to your one "lots of thanks" - its not a mistake
however "loads" means much more than "lots"
its a bit from the spoken british language
I used this one just to emphasize how much I appreciated you'd done it so fast - good job Emotion: smile)
Me too wish you - a nice day


My question is:
Is she right or wrong? Do you guys either in Great Britain or in the U.S. use this weird construction "loads of thanks" ?
TIA,
Vsevolod
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Vsevolod Ukrainsky > uk.culture.language.english
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Vsevolod Ukrainsky > misc.education.language.english in
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Vsevolod Ukrainsky > alt.languages.english
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Hello!

If you really need to post to more than one group, crossposting (sending only one copy of the article, marked so that it shows up in both newsgroups) is preferable to multiposting (a copy of the message on each group, that means more messages to download and people on a group not seeing answers to the same question on other groups).

To crosspost, you put both newsgroup names on the Newsgroups line of your article. Most newsreaders let you do that in a easy way.

Still better, set a Followup-to (fup2), to a single group that best fits the topic, where you ask people to send their answers.
Xpost e Fup2 news.software.readers

Enrico C
Vsevolod Ukrainsky > uk.culture.language.english
in
Hello!

Vsevolod Ukrainsky > misc.education.language.english in
Hello!

Vsevolod Ukrainsky > alt.languages.english
in
Hello!

If you really need to post to more than one group, crossposting (sending only one copy of the article, marked so that it shows up in all the newsgroups you want) is preferable to multiposting (a copy of the message on each group, that means more messages to download and people on a group not seeing answers to the same question on other groups).
To crosspost, you put all newsgroup names on the Newsgroups line of your article. Most newsreaders let you do that in an easy way.

Still better, set a Followup-to (fup2), to a single group that best fits the topic, where you ask people to send their answers.
Xpost and Fup2 news.software.readers

Enrico C
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Hello! My colleague at work asked me to publish a weekly report on a corporate web site. Upon completion I ... wrong? Do you guys either in Great Britain or in the U.S. use this weird construction "loads of thanks" ?

I can't speak for the US, but in the UK it's a well-used idiom, and I'd agree with your colleague that it's a more emphatic alternative to "lots".

Mike Stevens, narrowboat Felis Catus II
web site www.mike-stevens.co.uk
Old teachers never die, they simply lose their class.
>
Certainly common usage in the US, but to me it is not more emphatic, but more informal, "friendlier," than "lots" or "a lot of."

By the way, Enrico - do you object to cross-posting so strongly that you have to post it twice in this ng?
Russ
Give thanks in any situation, things can always get worse.
Russ
Russtrim > uk.culture.language.english
in
By the way, Enrico - do you object to cross-posting

I objected to multi-posting, that's different.

Enrico C
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hello! My colleague at work asked me to publish a ... the U.S. use this weird construction "loads of thanks" ?

I can't speak for the US, but in the UK it's a well-used idiom, and I'd agree with your colleague that it's a more emphatic alternative to "lots".

Not by me it isn't. Seems rather an 'odd' turn of phrase. Formally I'd go for 'thank you very much', informally, 'ta - or thanks - very much'. I couldn't ever see myself writing or saying 'loads of thanks', it just doesn't hang together nicely.
In article

, Vsevolod Ukrainsky (Email Removed) writes

Is she right or wrong? Do you guys either in Great Britain or in the U.S. use this weird construction "loads of thanks" ? TIA,

The "loadsa ..." expression became very popular some years ago with a comedy character on British television who used the catch phrase "loadsamoney!". I don't know which came first, though, the "loadsa ..." expression or the TV character.

Dave OSOS#24 (Email Removed) Remove my gerbil for email replies

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In article

,
(below there is a part of her message)

Ok I'll try to explain u what I meant my phrase ... I appreciated you'd done it so fast - good job Emotion: smile) Me too wish you - a nice day


Aaagh! If anyone sent me a message so densely packed with abuse of the English language I would immediately conclude that they were beyond saving. I've lost count of the errors. They clearly have no respect for the language whatsoever. The question of which variant of an idiom to use is inconsequential in comparison.

James Taylor, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, UK. PGP key: 3FBE1BF9 To protect against spam, the address in the "From:" header is not valid. In any case, you should reply to the group so that everyone can benefit. If you must send me a private email, use james at oakseed demon co uk.
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