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Hmm, Writing from California this seems remarkably odd, but ... The ancient, traditional and geographic county of Middlesex still exists. What doesn't exist anymore is the administrative entity that was overlaid on the ancient, traditional and geographic county!

So, does the Roman Empire still exist?
Hmm, Writing from California this seems remarkably odd, but ... ... that was overlaid on the ancient, traditional and geographic county!

So, does the Roman Empire still exist?

The Roman Empire is cognate with the administrative county, not the geographic county, so in fact you're consolidating Den's point.

Matti
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I always give mine as "Edgware, Middlesex" although I'm fairly sure that Middlesex has vanished.

Has it been destroyed? Or abducted by aliens? What has replaced it? A smouldering mass of ruins? A large whole in the ground? A stinking morass? (Some might count any of those as environmental improvement.)

Middlesex no longer exists as an administrative entity. Some argue that it still exists as a geographical expression. OK, but I think those who argue that are a bit precious. If you really want to argue that the county boundaries as established in the 15th century or whenever still exist, then why use (as this sort generally do) "Middlesex" to mean the north-west suburbs of London, a usage that applied only from 1888-1965? Does Westminster count as part of Middlesex? Or Stepney? Ought to if you really mean the old counties.

The traditional county of Middlesex was a small one which happened to have London in it. But up until the early 19th century, London was still just a few square miles. In 1888 when County Councils were set up, a separate county administration of London was established, eating a large chunk out of the traditional Middlesex, the remainder still being given its own county administration. However, in 1965 the "Greater London County" was established, in recognition that what most people though of as "London" had grown to absorb many of the surrounding villages and small towns - including almost all of traditional Middlesex, but also parts of Surrey, Kent, Essex and even a little of Hertfordshire.
The situation was muddled by the fact that the Post Office continued to use in its official addresses county names in a way that didn't recognise the changes of administration of 1965. So the south-western fringes of London still had "Surrey" addresses, the south-eastern still had "Kent" addresses, the eastern still had "Essex" addresses, even though the administrative counties which still had those names no longer covered those parts. Middlesex was unusual because the administrative county was almost entirely swallowed up by London, so the name continued in postal addresses while no longer existing as an administration.
I wrote "almost entirely swallowed" because a part of Middlesex was not swallowed by London - it was placed administratively under Surrey County Council instead.
Matthew Huntbach
Has it been destroyed? Or abducted by aliens? What has ... morass? (Some might count any of those as environmental improvement.)

Middlesex no longer exists as an administrative entity. Some argue that it still exists as a geographical expression. OK, but ... 1888-1965? Does Westminster count as part of Middlesex? Or Stepney? Ought to if you really mean the old counties.

I certainly wouldn't restrict "Middlesex" to those suburbs. The whole virtue and continuing attraction of the "traditional" counties is that they represent a stable, complete, non-overlapping, single-layer division of the entire territory of the UK. These administrative regions purporting to be the new "counties" pop into and out of existence at the drop of a mayoral hat, and change their names and their boundaries on a monthly basis they are just completely useless as enduring geographical and cultural locators.
The Royal Mail still thinks Middlesex exists, by the way. If you pop over to its postcode finder site and ask about "Church Road, Ashford", it will ask you whether you mean Ashford, Middlesex or Ashford, Kent.

Matti