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Spelling it correctly - Magdalene

So it's "Mary Maudlin" over there then?

Indeed not. My main reply to Tony's post is in aeu where I point out that the two colleges plus Magdalen Bridge and Magdalen Road in Oxford are pronounced "maudlin". But otherwise you say "Mag-da-lenn" in Oxford - eg for Magdalen Street, Magdalen Street East and St Mary Magdalen Church and, of course, for the Magdalene herself.
John Dean
Oxford
The House, in an Oxonian context, means ... but that ... the colleges. The one where all the clever hoorays go.)

Balliol?

Ch.Ch.
Mike.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Custom as in customer? Do you not speak of customers in the USA?

Yes, but we haven't spoken of "custom" in the sense of "business, patronage by customers" in, I'm guessing, an hundred years or more, if we ever actually did.
So what *is* a bilateral school? A condominium?

No. A condominium is one of those things they have a lot of down where Coop is.
Things I missed when I was in Oxford: The Carfax. I'm so used to congested intersections that Oxford's seemed rather ordinary.

Did you notice that in Britain intersections are called junctions?

Sometimes they are in the US too, but "intersection" is the usual term today for the junction of two ordinary streets. In at least some states there's a standard "JCT" sign that indicates the intersecting of two numbered highway routes (or, more precisely, the intersection of the route the driver is currently on with another one, and sometimes the intersection is more constructive (i.e., it may indicate a merging of two numbered routes)).
"Junction" to me suggests the intersection of streets that are sufficiently important. That might be because the intersection of two important streets in Brooklyn (Fourth Largest City in America), Flatbush and Nostrand Avenues, was traditionally called "The Junction".
Things that struck me: It seems that most of the ... religious title. It's America, though, that is associated with religion.

Oxford University, before it was secularised, belonged to the Church of England. It was started by the Church (before the church of England separated from Rome). If the Bob Jones University in the US were secularised, you might find similar hangovers after a few years.

I don't think that's what Coop is getting at. When Coop's right he's right. British people love to go on about how atheistic they are, but they're the first ones to talk about "vicars" when's the last time you heard an American use the word "vicar"? If there's one term that really defines British culture for me, it's "vicar". Surely you, as a SAfrE person who's thought a lot (or "alot" as you say down there) about both British culture and religion, you must agree with me. So yeah, Coop's right to pick up on this irony, an irony that, judging from what I read in AUE, is one that British people themselves are unaware of. Vicars, Steve. Vicars. Say it, Steve. "Vicars."
As an American, I think of a university as an ... is one of the colleges that make up the university.

Not quite the same thing, I suspect. The "schools" you refer to correspond roughly to what at universities in Britain ... theology and education have been lumped together as the "school" of humanities. So a school is a kind of super-faculty.

Right. In this case, Coop is not right.
In collegiate universities, like Oxford, Cambridge and Durham, the colleges are independent self-governing institutions, which usually provide tuition to their ... get mail from both soliciting my contributions, and the university provides its alumni with a very good e-mail forwarding service.

I don't know of any American university that has a structure like that of Oxford or Cambridge. There are some universities that have relatively loose affiliations with particular schools that might be seen to be part of the university (I'm thinking of the relationship between the Union Theological Seminary and Columbia University, but I don't really completely understand what it is).
I can't speak for the Brits, but I certainly wouldn't say you were thick as two short planks. Countries and ... own culture and ethos, and even when they are in the same country, they differ quite markedly from each other.

You are correct, sir. Coop's Hiberno-Britophilicism is getting the best of him.

Steny '08!
Spelling it correctly - Magdalene

So it's "Mary Maudlin" over there then?

Unfortunately, not. Why make it easy, FGS? The colleges were founded under Latin names when few people could read even English. The saint was a popular one in England, and the derived Christian name "Madeline", from French, often became "Maudlin". (Chaucer's shipman had a bark called "The Maudelayne".) I think the
spelling-pronunciation must be the product of more general literacy and the translation of the Bible into English. I also think -au- was quite often a rendering of a sound more like our -ah.

Even the heroically bells-and-smells (is it still like that?)church in Oxford is pronounced "Mary Magdalen" as spelt, or just "Mary Mag".

Mike.
Tony Cooper wrote

I've seen "stove blacking" before, but what is it and ... assume it's polish, but I can't picture polishing a stove.

I think it comes in a tube, like toothpaste. Unlike mosttoothpastes, it's black. You use a cloth to rub it into cast iron until itgleams. Aesthetics aside, it prevents corrosion. I've been sitting here trying to remember the main brand name, but with no success.

Wasn't it something like "Zebrite"? I feel I remember an orange-striped tube, if that isn't the old Australian Ipana toothpaste. I tried to buy some last year, but the ironmonger said he didn't get it any more. In literature, it's represented by such expressions as "a black-leaded stove", as it was a suspension of powdered graphite.
Mike.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The House, in an Oxonian context, means ... but that ... the colleges. The one where all the clever hoorays go.)

Balliol?

Christ Church College. (Haven't you read Gaudy Night?)

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
Things I didn't know: Hot milk is sometimes provided withtea.

As you know, tea doesn't always mean tea. Can you provide more context?

I suspect context may reveal only poor research by the author. Being given hot milk with tea is one of the things British writers used to say happened when one went abroad: in Br it's about as likely as being offered chocolate sauce with fish and chips. (Mind you, my first wife's table was once victim of a Portuguese college servant's confusion between gravy and chocolate sauce.)
Mike.
Tony Cooper wrote (snippage for space abounds hereon):

The author rents a house in Oxford and is told ... assume it's polish, but I can't picture polishing a stove.

I think it comes in a tube, like toothpaste. Unlike most toothpastes, it's black. You use a cloth to rub ... Aesthetics aside, it prevents corrosion. I've been sitting here trying to remember the main brand name, but with no success.

Zebrite.
At least, I think so, without going downstairs to look. It's also used to mix into the putty used in stained glass windows, which is why I have some.

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Things I didn't know: Hot milk is sometimes provided with tea.

As you know, tea doesn't always mean tea. Can you provide more context?

I don't think I need to look up the actual context to explain it. She was talking about providing milk for the tea (to put in the tea) and the milk was heated. It makes perfect sense to me. Cold milk cools the tea, and hot milk doesn't. I've just never heard of anyone going to the trouble.
If I have to look up other references, I'll try to find the line where this was mentioned.
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