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Maizie, frog and "doom painting" I'd never heard of

I've never heard of them either.

Frog is the current term for the spiky plastic thing like a tiny upturned table, on which one impales the chunk of Oasis or floral foam into which one sticks one's flowers (I think we've addressed this before). Floral foam wasn't around when this book was written, however, so I guess it may mean one of the old hemi-spherical glass thingies with holes in it, which is put at the bottom of the flower-vase.
I've never heard either of these called a Maizie, though, and I'm now wondering whether it's a) a variant spelling of Maisie*, and therefore simply a female name for a useful thing, as in Lazy Susan, or b) a reference to some now-vanished object with either holes or spikes, made of or looking like some part of the maize plant. Neither Google nor Webster helps. I may be reduced to asking the more elderly among my flower-arranging acquaintances.
*'Maizie' seems to be the spelling of a current girl's name in UsE, but in BrE it belongs to a vanished era, and I've never seen it other than with an s.

Katy Jennison
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As you know, tea doesn't always mean tea. Can you provide more context?

I don't think I need to look up the actual context to explain it. She was talking about providing milk ... the trouble. If I have to look up other references, I'll try to find the line where this was mentioned.

Surely you realize that "tea" can mean the meal rather than the beverage? That's why the context is important.
Matti
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I don't think that's what Coop is getting at. When Coop's right he's right. British people love to go on ... I read in AUE, is one that British people themselves are unaware of. Vicars, Steve. Vicars. Say it, Steve. "Vicars."

Perhaps I was corrupted by a year's residence in Britain, but for me a good deal of bawdry would be unavailable without vicars:

Sue said, with a snicker,
"The vicar was quicker,"
Six convicted vicars,
Five choir boys,
etc., etc.

Joe Fineman joe (Email Removed)
Tony Cooper wrote (snippage for space abounds hereon): I think ... to remember the main brand name, but with no success.

Zebrite.

Rhymes with Yosemite?
tea.

As you know, tea doesn't always mean tea. Can you provide more context?

I suspect context may reveal only poor research by the author. Being given hot milk with tea is one of ... (Mind you, my first wife's table was once victim of a Portuguese college servant's confusion between gravy and chocolate sauce.)

However, being offered hot milk with coffee has happened to me several times in Dutch homes, and never back in the US. I feel guilty, it's such a bother for the host/ess to beat it with a whisk in a saucepan. I suppose I'm not supposed to worry.

Best Donna Richoux
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Things I wonder about: Do pay phones in England still have the "B" button?

No, not for a long time. I was born in 1960, and can only just remember them. And even that might be a false memory.

It probably depends where you lived. I remember a Button B box from
1980 but then I lived in a village where the very newest postbox said Gnot E. I have no idea if the Button B was still operable, but I do remember that we Brownies were instructed to always carry a tuppence for the phone.
Jac
snip
"Oxbridge" means both Oxford and Cambridge. I thought it was a term about Oxford. I'm still not sure about "Oxan".

"Oxon" the abbreviation (from Latin) of the city/county name.

snip
Things that struck me: It seems that most of the aue regulars that are from the UK do not practice ... a Rabbi or a Priest, but seldom anyone with a religious title. It's America, though, that is associated with religion.

As a culture the UK has generally abandoned active worship and museumised the temples; that's why the US practice of religious worship and proclaiming one's belief creeps many of us out.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
I also think -au- was quite often a rendering of a sound more like our -ah.

Sparky could have told us that.

Steny '08!
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I don't think I need to look up the actual ... I'll try to find the line where this was mentioned.

Surely you realize that "tea" can mean the meal rather than the beverage? That's why the context is important.

Matti, I'm fully aware of the meanings of "tea". Trust me on this. She was referring to a jug of hot milk to pour in tea. I'll skim the book and try to find it again, but give me a little credit here.
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