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Zebrite.

Rhymes with Yosemite?

Not quite. Or rather, not not quite.

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
British people love to go on about how atheistic they are, but they're the first ones to talk about "vicars" ... heard an American use the word "vicar"? If there's one term that really defines British culture for me, it's "vicar".

The key wrd here is "culture". The Church of England, with its inherited historic buildings, its vicars and its elderly female flower-arrangers, is 90% a historical-cultural creature to most Brits, and only 10% a religious one. In the UK it's perfectly possible to be an atheist/agnostic/Pagan/Buddhist/Bahai etc and still appreciate and celebrate the architectural, musical and cultural heritage of which the C of E is the principal current custodian.
One of the advantages of Establishment is that, paradoxically, it separates the Church from religion.

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Surely you realize that "tea" can mean the meal rather than the beverage? That's why the context is important.

Matti, I'm fully aware of the meanings of "tea". Trust me on this. She was referring to a jug of hot milk to pour in tea. I'll skim the book and try to find it again, but give me a little credit here.

Tony, I'd trust you on most things, but NOT when it comes to "tea". There is NO WAY that anyone in Britain would EVER put hot milk into a cup of tea. It's simply ludicrous.
Matti
Tony Cooper typed thusly:
Surely you realize that "tea" can mean the meal rather than the beverage? That's why the context is important.

Matti, I'm fully aware of the meanings of "tea". Trust me on this. She was referring to a jug of hot milk to pour in tea. I'll skim the book and try to find it again, but give me a little credit here.

When I worked in a faded Edwardian hotel as a porter and general dogs body, we were taught to heat the milk delivered with coffee by steaming it. There was a spout from which issued steam, which you put into the jug of milk to heat it. But only cold milk was delivered with tea.

David
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replace usenet with the
Matti, I'm fully aware of the meanings of "tea". Trust ... find it again, but give me a little credit here.

Tony, I'd trust you on most things, but NOT when it comes to "tea". There is NO WAY that anyone in Britain would EVER put hot milk into a cup of tea. It's simply ludicrous.

Muriel Beadle was writing about Oxford in the 1950s when there were still some wildly eccentric people about who might just have done this. My mother tells of lunch with the Misses Spooner which was a very bizarre occasion where the menu included spaghetti, without any sauce, and white blancmange.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Tony Cooper typed thusly:
Things that struck me: It seems that most of the aue regulars that are from the UK do not practice ... one of the characters being the Rector or the Vicar or the woman that does the flowers in the church.

You're not reading the same books as me. All that stuff is over 50 years old, and quite possibly related to the upper classes. You are keen on some UK TV. How many references to religion have you seen in Coupling, My Family, Men Behaving Badly or Cold Feet? Or, indeed, in Sliding Doors, Bridget Jones or any other "realistic" film or TV programme set in the UK? If there are any reference I would expect them to be cultural, e.g. people wanting to get married in church because it's prettier.
A British tourist could do the whole of the US and might visit only three religious buildings: The Old North Church in Boston, St Patrick's Cathedral in New York, and the Mormon Tabernacle.

Damn. Missed one. I'll have to go around again.
If you read a book set in America, you might read about a Rabbi or a Priest, but seldom anyone with a religious title. It's America, though, that is associated with religion.

Count the congregations. The vast majority of UK churches are running empty. Even the great cathedrals have few regular worshipers, even if they have thousands of visitors. Country churches have to share vicars - one vicar to three or four parishes. Tourist attractions is what they are.

David
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replace usenet with the
Matti, I'm fully aware of the meanings of "tea". Trust ... find it again, but give me a little credit here.

Tony, I'd trust you on most things, but NOT when it comes to "tea". There is NO WAY that anyone in Britain would EVER put hot milk intoa cup of tea. It's simply ludicrous.

You can trust Tony to report what he read in a book, shirley? He it was who drew the comparison with A Year in Provence : you wouldn't believe what you read in that, would you?
As I say, it's like chocolate sauce and fish and chips: if anybody did it, they'd clearly be eccentric or a bit potty. (The late Lord Redesdale was served, when my old school chaplain went to tea, with cold coffee in what seemed to be a chamber-pot. The British Isles are expert at the production of pottiness.) I think it's a case of authorial over-egging, or else some kind of misunderstanding on the author's part or the landlady's: I can imagine devious means by which even a sane landlady or scout might have got the impression that this was the kind of thing Americans liked.
Mike.
> however, so I guess it may mean one of the old hemi-spherical glass
thingies with holes in it, which is put at the bottom of the flower-vase. I've never heard either of these ... a) a variant spelling of Maisie*, andtherefore simply a female name for a useful thing, as in Lazy Susan,

I wonder if it was a brand-name?
Mike.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
tea. I suspect context may reveal only poor research by ... a Portuguese college servant's confusion between gravy and chocolate sauce.)

However, being offered hot milk with coffee has happened to me several times in Dutch homes, and never back in ... bother for the host/ess to beat it with a whisk in a saucepan. I suppose I'm not supposed to worry.

It used to be common,
for pouring in cold milk cools the coffee to much. It went out of fashion,
with concentrated coffee milk becoming readily available. (And drinking black coffee became fashionable)
The microwave has caused some revival though,
Jan
PS Drinking tea with milk was common the Netherlands, long ago. (Before WW II, I guess)
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