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Whoops! I have been telling people for decades that Magdalene is pronounced as it is spelt and that only Magdalen ... that my past is not wholly confabulated. (I was at Cambridge from '76 to'78, or '77 to '79, or something.)

I posted the boring truth about this one earlier today. Well, no, not boring at all, actually: I think it was dead fascinating.
There must be other differences between England and Indiana, but that's the only thing that comes immediately to mind.

Nice feed. I'm too hungry to do it justice, alas.

In my case not drunk enough. But you're right: a damned good feed. Could you do it again as a dessert some time, Tony?

Mike.
OK, Matti, because it's you I went back and skimmed ... England. Either use would serve to keep the beverage hotter.

Oh, well, that explains it. My parents routinely heated milk for coffee, from the 1940s (and probably earlier, but that's ... deaths a few years ago I know people who do it today. (Personally, I hate it.) But never for tea.

I stand, sit, and move about corrected on the tea/coffee point, but why the "never" for tea? If it makes sense for coffee, then why not tea? And, why do you hate it? Would it alter the taste?

I think it's highly impractical, but hateful?
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OK, Matti, because it's you I went back and skimmed ... England. Either use would serve to keep the beverage hotter.

Oh, well, that explains it. My parents routinely heated milk for coffee, from the 1940s (and probably earlier, but that's not within my memory) until their deaths a few years ago I know people who do it today. (Personally, I hate it.)

In France it is standard:
order a 'Cafe au lait' and you will get a big cup of coffee and a jar of hot milk.
Not to bad, with breakfast,
Jan
Tony Cooper typed thusly:

Dibley. That was, of course, predicated on the comic potential of a woman vicar. They could hardly do that without referring to the church, although there is precious little religion in it.
How about the Vicar in "Keeping Up Appearances"? Remember, what we get here is quite a bit behind what you may see there.

I've never watched more than a few minutes of that; I didn't know there was a vicar. But I would suggest that it would be extremely difficult to find anybody who resembled the characters in this, whereas there are people like those in the other programmes I mentioned (albeit without their quick wit and flawless timing).
Count the congregations. The vast majority of UK churches are ... three or four parishes. Tourist attractions is what they are.

You know this, but it's not obvious to the casual observer. As a tourist, did you notice how full our churches are or aren't?

No, you are right, I haven't examined that. I wasn't expecting you to know that our churches are empty. I merely offer it as evidence. The information we get on our news media is that a large percentage of the US population attends weekly worship. Here, it is a tiny percentage, and it's very tiny indeed if you discount recent arrivals (I mean less than 100 years). Attendance at worship is far higher amongst Muslims, and possibly also amongst Hindus and Jews.

David
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Tony, I'd trust you on most things, but NOT when ... hot milk into a cup of tea. It's simply ludicrous.

OK, Matti, because it's you I went back and skimmed the book until I found the reference on page 48. ... corrected to "coffee", but do you find it ludicrous to put hot milk in coffee but not tea at breakfast?

I much prefer hot (scalded, not boiled) milk in my (strong) coffee, and many hotels and restaurants in the UK will serve it in a pair of jugs; a jug of cold milk is treated by me in the same way as an uncooked tomato in my fried breakfast.
I'm aware of the Spanish-style coffees with milk added, but I think that rather misses the point here. Perhaps not. If milk is added to tea (and surely you agree some do do that), then what is ludicrous about the temperature of the milk?

You could be right it's quite possible that tea might benefit rather than suffer from warm milk. It's a pity you weren't around 200 years ago to make the suggestion, because it's too late now to try out newfangled concepts like that.
Matti
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Evan Kirshenbaum typed thusly:
You're not reading the same books as me. All that ... How many references to religion have you seen in Coupling,

Well, there's the funeral in season one ("Sex, Death, and Nudity"). Also

For most people, funerals are cultural events, rather than religious ones. There is an amount of inertia in the celebrating of life events (hatch, match and despatch), which frequently take place in religious surroundings even thought the participants never otherwise stray inside.
"When God made the ***, he didn't say, 'Hey, it's just your basic hinge, let's knock off early.' He said, ... again a few times over season 3. The scene with Jane explaining things to his Christian discussion group is hilarious.

True, I had forgotten that character. I can't exactly remember, but I expect that his faith is treated with suspicion by the other characters, as they are not used to being around such people.

David
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Tony Cooper typed thusly:
I knew about Magdalen, but what about Balliol?

Looking at the word, I would pronounce it "Bally-oll" or "Bally-ole". I'm quite sure, though, that the English pronounce it ... given oral instructions, would never associate the sound of the word with the sight of the word on a map.

Well, yes, of course. A war-time film warning of beastly German spies has a couple of old ladies arresting one after he asked directions to "Jevon's Wood"

David
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Oh, well, that explains it. My parents routinely heated milk ... it today. (Personally, I hate it.) But never for tea.

I stand, sit, and move about corrected on the tea/coffee point, but why the "never" for tea? If it makes sense for coffee, then why not tea? And, why do you hate it? Would it alter the taste? I think it's highly impractical, but hateful?

It certainly alters the taste of coffee. It probably makes a difference whether it's simply warmed, or heated to near or above boiling point, though; I very much like the effect of the steamed milk in capuccino.
Now I think about it, I suspect that for me personally it's partly an old association thing: I have bad memories of being forced to drink hot milk, complete with yukky skin, in hospital when I was a very small child, and this set up a strong aversion to the smell, taste, and concept of hot milk, and my only other regular, frequent encounter with hot milk was seeing and smelling it heating for my parents' coffee. This didn't extend to a dislike of cocoa, possibly because that was only a rare treat.
I admit I've never tried hot (or warmed) milk in tea, and I'd be disinclined to do so anyway, for the above reasons. But the real answer is that it's simply Not Done. I don't know why. All the possible drawbacks I can think of (like it cooling in the jug and forming a skin during the interval between pouring one's first and one's second cup) apply, I'd have thought, equally to coffee.

There may be a good scientific reason. I wonder if the incomparable Harold McGee says anything about this. But I'm too tired to go and look.

Katy Jennison
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Hmm. Was it a particularly gaudy part of the city?

Sorry, meant to write "Gaudi part ..." ... oh, dammit!

I thought you'd done it on purpose! Never mind, we'll have one more Gaudi night...
Mike.
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