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1.Flies live longest in cool temparatures.

2.Flies live the longest in cool temparatures.

Is there any difference?

Thanks,
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Comments  
I think " the" an definite article is required before "longest " a superlative.
'Flies live longest...' implies a comparison to how long they live in warmer temperatures

'Flies live the longest...' implies a comparison with the lifespans of other species.
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Davkett'Flies live longest...' implies a comparison to how long they live in warmer temperatures

'Flies live the longest...' implies a comparison with the lifespans of other species.

Hi, Dave! Happy New Year!

For the first one, since it implies that there's a comparison between how long they live in colder and warmer temperatures, why can I use the superlative form of the adjective here?

Why not,

Flies live longer in cold temperatures.
1. This shop is best for noodles.

2. This shop is the best for noodles.

3. This shop is best for its noodles.

4. This shop is the best for its noodles.

Which of the above sentences do you think is semantically odd or not acceptable?
Flies normally cannot live in cold temperatures.

However, they live longer in warm temperatures than in hot temperatures.

And they live longest in cool temperatures.
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PASTELWhy not,

Flies live longer in cold temperatures.

Dear Pastel,

In my opinion it is acceptable to say «flies live longer».

It is strange to say «in cold temperatures» however. It is first necessary to define «cold», I think. Emotion: smile

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
Pastel, your question is reasonable, given the way I stated the implication of the first example. Teo gives a pertinent defense in explaining that cool is compared to hot, warm, and cold, not just to warm.


Yet, the intent of the original statement appears to be not a comparison between temperatures but between lifespans. My original argument might have been better posed like this:

'Flies live longest...' indicates a comparison within the complete range of the possible lifespans for flies living in other temperatures.

'Flies live the longest...' can possibly be interpreted, minus any context, as implying a comparison with the lifespans of other species in cool temperatures.

Goldmund
In my opinion it is acceptable to say «flies live longer».

I think so, too, Goldmund, but only if the intent is not to state a fact about the longest they can live, (relative to temperature). Wouldn't one be able to speculate that if flies live longer in cool temperatures, they might live the longest they can live the more the temperature drops?
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